A Numerical Study of the Effect of Forced Convection on Mass Transport from a Thin Oblate Spheroid of Ice in Air

R. L. Pitter Dept. of Meteorology, University of California, Los Angeles 90024

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H. R. Pruppacher Dept. of Meteorology, University of California, Los Angeles 90024

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A. E. Hamielec Dept. of Chemical Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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Abstract

Numerical solutions have been found for the vapor density field around a simple ice plate, idealized as an oblate spheroid of axis ratio 0.05, having Reynolds numbers between 0.1 and 20, and failing in a fluid of Schmidt number 0.71. The present solutions are compared with experimental data after Thorpe and Mason for evaporating ice plates, the numerical results of Masliyah and Epstein for oblate spheroids of axis ratio 0.2, and the analytical results of Brenner for thin disks. It is shown that the ventilation coefficient varies linearly with NScNRc½ at higher Reynolds numbers, while as the Reynolds number approaches zero it approaches its stationary value via the analytical solution of Brenner. Over the range of Reynolds numbers investigated, ventilation coefficients for thin oblate spheroids were found to be lower than those for spheres.

Abstract

Numerical solutions have been found for the vapor density field around a simple ice plate, idealized as an oblate spheroid of axis ratio 0.05, having Reynolds numbers between 0.1 and 20, and failing in a fluid of Schmidt number 0.71. The present solutions are compared with experimental data after Thorpe and Mason for evaporating ice plates, the numerical results of Masliyah and Epstein for oblate spheroids of axis ratio 0.2, and the analytical results of Brenner for thin disks. It is shown that the ventilation coefficient varies linearly with NScNRc½ at higher Reynolds numbers, while as the Reynolds number approaches zero it approaches its stationary value via the analytical solution of Brenner. Over the range of Reynolds numbers investigated, ventilation coefficients for thin oblate spheroids were found to be lower than those for spheres.

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