The Influence of Ozone and Aerosols on the Brightness and Color of the Twilight Sky

Charles N. Adams Dept. of Physics, Texas A&M University, College Station 77843

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Gilbert N. Plass Dept. of Physics, Texas A&M University, College Station 77843

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George W. Kattawar Dept. of Physics, Texas A&M University, College Station 77843

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Abstract

The radiance and color of the twilight sky are calculated for single scattered radiation with the use of spherical symmetric models of the earth's atmosphere. Spherical geometry is used throughout the calculations with no plane parallel approximations. Refraction effects are taken into account through fine subdivision of the atmosphere into spherical shells of fixed index of refraction. Snell's law of refraction is used to calculate a new direction of travel each time that a photon traverses the interface between layers. Five different models of the atmosphere were used: a pure molecular scattering atmosphere; molecular atmosphere plus ozone absorption; and three models with aerosol concentrations of one, three and ten times normal together with molecular scattering and ozone absorption. The results of the calculations are shown for various observation positions and local viewing angles in the solar plane for wavelengths in the range of 0.40 to 0.75 µm.

Abstract

The radiance and color of the twilight sky are calculated for single scattered radiation with the use of spherical symmetric models of the earth's atmosphere. Spherical geometry is used throughout the calculations with no plane parallel approximations. Refraction effects are taken into account through fine subdivision of the atmosphere into spherical shells of fixed index of refraction. Snell's law of refraction is used to calculate a new direction of travel each time that a photon traverses the interface between layers. Five different models of the atmosphere were used: a pure molecular scattering atmosphere; molecular atmosphere plus ozone absorption; and three models with aerosol concentrations of one, three and ten times normal together with molecular scattering and ozone absorption. The results of the calculations are shown for various observation positions and local viewing angles in the solar plane for wavelengths in the range of 0.40 to 0.75 µm.

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