Periodic Variations in Stratospheric-Mesospheric Temperature from 20–65 km at 80°N to 30°S

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Abstract

The 12-year mean temperature and the amplitude and phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and first three harmonies of the annual wave are presented on height-latitude sections, 20 to 65 km, 80°N to 30°S. New features include adjusting the long-term mean temperature for errors due to solar radiation effects and for biasing by the diurnal tide. Due to the longer period of record used here, the extratropical QBO differs from that reported previously in the literature. Amplitudes of the annual wave at 30°S are larger than those at 30°N at all levels; the amplitude ratio is greatest near 50 km. The largest amplitude (7°C) of the semiannual wave in the stratosphere or mesosphere is near 75°N at 32 km. The terannual wave's amplitude near 35 km at 55°N is as large as the amplitude of the semiannual wave there and is larger than the well-known tropical %semiannual wave. These thermal properties of the upper atmosphere require theoretical explanations, stratosphere modelers should be able to reproduce them, and continued observations are needed to describe their hemispheric differences at high latitudes and altitudes.

Abstract

The 12-year mean temperature and the amplitude and phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and first three harmonies of the annual wave are presented on height-latitude sections, 20 to 65 km, 80°N to 30°S. New features include adjusting the long-term mean temperature for errors due to solar radiation effects and for biasing by the diurnal tide. Due to the longer period of record used here, the extratropical QBO differs from that reported previously in the literature. Amplitudes of the annual wave at 30°S are larger than those at 30°N at all levels; the amplitude ratio is greatest near 50 km. The largest amplitude (7°C) of the semiannual wave in the stratosphere or mesosphere is near 75°N at 32 km. The terannual wave's amplitude near 35 km at 55°N is as large as the amplitude of the semiannual wave there and is larger than the well-known tropical %semiannual wave. These thermal properties of the upper atmosphere require theoretical explanations, stratosphere modelers should be able to reproduce them, and continued observations are needed to describe their hemispheric differences at high latitudes and altitudes.

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