Wave-CISK and Convective Mesosystems

View More View Less
  • 1 New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro 87801
© Get Permissions
Full access

Abstract

With the CISK hypothesis (Convective Instability of the Second Kind), Charney and Eliassen (1964) and Ooyama (1964) introduced a simple means of handling the interaction between cumulus convection and a larger scale flow. The author has shown that a wave-CISK model (i.e., the larger scale flow resembles a gravity wave) can be used to predict the motion of severe convective storms.

The purpose of this paper is to show that the above model explains the structure and rapid development of these disturbances. It is found that flow patterns characteristic of such systems can evolve explosively from an initially weak, structureless region of low-level convergence in less than 1 h.

The present model does not include the effects of environmental rotation. This limitation apparently prevents the model from properly simulating the tornado cyclone.

Abstract

With the CISK hypothesis (Convective Instability of the Second Kind), Charney and Eliassen (1964) and Ooyama (1964) introduced a simple means of handling the interaction between cumulus convection and a larger scale flow. The author has shown that a wave-CISK model (i.e., the larger scale flow resembles a gravity wave) can be used to predict the motion of severe convective storms.

The purpose of this paper is to show that the above model explains the structure and rapid development of these disturbances. It is found that flow patterns characteristic of such systems can evolve explosively from an initially weak, structureless region of low-level convergence in less than 1 h.

The present model does not include the effects of environmental rotation. This limitation apparently prevents the model from properly simulating the tornado cyclone.

Save