Energy Exchange and Temperature of Aerosols in the Earth's Atmosphere (0-60 km)

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  • 1 Università, Istituto di Fisica, Roma, Italy
  • | 2 National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colo. 80307
  • | 3 Università, Istituto di Fisica, Roma, Italy
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Abstract

A previous analysis (Fiocco et al., 1975) of the energetic equilibrium of small particles in the earth's upper atmosphere is extended to the 0–60 km region. The analysis is based on establishing a balance among the energy absorbed from solar and planetary radiation fields, the energy radiated by the particles, and the sensible heat exchanged through collisions with the ambient gas. The planetary radiation field is calculated as a function of altitude and includes radiation from the surface as well as emission and absorption by the infrared bands of CO2, O3, and H2O The various energy term change as a function of radius and altitude of the particles, season, time of day and the earth's albedo. Thus aerosols may beat or cool the atmosphere and their temperature may. differ from the ambient gas temperature. Maximum and average values for the heating rates induced by the particles into the ambient gas are computed for summer and winter 45°N conditions.

Abstract

A previous analysis (Fiocco et al., 1975) of the energetic equilibrium of small particles in the earth's upper atmosphere is extended to the 0–60 km region. The analysis is based on establishing a balance among the energy absorbed from solar and planetary radiation fields, the energy radiated by the particles, and the sensible heat exchanged through collisions with the ambient gas. The planetary radiation field is calculated as a function of altitude and includes radiation from the surface as well as emission and absorption by the infrared bands of CO2, O3, and H2O The various energy term change as a function of radius and altitude of the particles, season, time of day and the earth's albedo. Thus aerosols may beat or cool the atmosphere and their temperature may. differ from the ambient gas temperature. Maximum and average values for the heating rates induced by the particles into the ambient gas are computed for summer and winter 45°N conditions.

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