Horizontal Coherence Decay Near Large Mesoscale Variations in Topography

Steven G. Perry Pennsylvania State University Park, PA 16801

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John M. Norman Pennsylvania State University Park, PA 16801

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Hans A. Panofsky Pennsylvania State University Park, PA 16801

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J. David Martsolf Pennsylvania State University Park, PA 16801

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Abstract

A surface layer experiment is described which includes measurements of turbulent velocities at 2 m above the surface with an army of newly developed drag anemometers. The experiment site is located in central Pennsylvania where mesoscale topographic irregularities exist. The presence of a low mountain ridge near the site affects the estimated lateral scale of turbulence and the fluctuations of the lateral velocity component. A good correlation has been found between the variance spectrum of the lateral (or crosswind) velocity component and an estimate of the lateral Eulerian integral scale of the longitudinal velocity component. This can provide future estimates of the lateral scale from turbulent velocity measurements at a single location.

A model for the decay of horizontal coherence which accounts for the stability, roughness and instrument separation has been suggested in a previous paper by Panofsky and Mizuno. The present data compare favorably with this model. The effect of stability on coherence decay is found to have a definite site dependence.

Abstract

A surface layer experiment is described which includes measurements of turbulent velocities at 2 m above the surface with an army of newly developed drag anemometers. The experiment site is located in central Pennsylvania where mesoscale topographic irregularities exist. The presence of a low mountain ridge near the site affects the estimated lateral scale of turbulence and the fluctuations of the lateral velocity component. A good correlation has been found between the variance spectrum of the lateral (or crosswind) velocity component and an estimate of the lateral Eulerian integral scale of the longitudinal velocity component. This can provide future estimates of the lateral scale from turbulent velocity measurements at a single location.

A model for the decay of horizontal coherence which accounts for the stability, roughness and instrument separation has been suggested in a previous paper by Panofsky and Mizuno. The present data compare favorably with this model. The effect of stability on coherence decay is found to have a definite site dependence.

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