Vertical-Zonal Propagation of a Stationary Planetary Wave Packet

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  • 1 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory/NOAA, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540
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Abstract

In order to explain why the Aleutian high stands out in the winter stratosphere, a complex Fourier analysis is made of simulated and observed stationary waves. It is found that in the troposphere the envelope of the time mean geopotential height consisting of wavenumbers 1 ∼ 3 attains its major and minor maxima in the Pacific and Atlantic, respectively. The major maximum is dominated by wavenumbers 1 ∼ 2 and shifts eastward with height in the stratosphere in the approximate direction of the group velocity and strengthens the Aleutian high. The minor maximum is dominated by wavenumber 3 and is confined in the troposphere.

Abstract

In order to explain why the Aleutian high stands out in the winter stratosphere, a complex Fourier analysis is made of simulated and observed stationary waves. It is found that in the troposphere the envelope of the time mean geopotential height consisting of wavenumbers 1 ∼ 3 attains its major and minor maxima in the Pacific and Atlantic, respectively. The major maximum is dominated by wavenumbers 1 ∼ 2 and shifts eastward with height in the stratosphere in the approximate direction of the group velocity and strengthens the Aleutian high. The minor maximum is dominated by wavenumber 3 and is confined in the troposphere.

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