Jovian Winds from Voyager 2. Part II: Analysis of Eddy Transports

L. A. Sromovsky Space Science & Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706

Search for other papers by L. A. Sromovsky in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
H. E. Revercomb Space Science & Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706

Search for other papers by H. E. Revercomb in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
V. E. Suomi Space Science & Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706

Search for other papers by V. E. Suomi in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
S. S. Limaye Space Science & Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706

Search for other papers by S. S. Limaye in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
R. J. Krauss Space Science & Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706

Search for other papers by R. J. Krauss in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Full access

Abstract

Previous Voyager 1 and 2 Jovian circulation measurements exhibit a large positive correlation between eddy momentum transports and the meridional shear of the zonal wind component, implying a very large rate of conversion of eddy kinetic energy into kinetic energy of the zonal jets. Examination of the vectors mainly responsible for the correlation in our recent Voyager 2 global measurements indicates that it is probably caused by a biased sampling of prominent cloud features associated with circulating eddies. Intensive diagnostic measurements with more nearly uniform spatial sampling show no significant correlation in regions where our original measurements showed strong correlations. If the sampling bias mechanism is fully accounted for in all Jovian circulation measurements, the estimated eddy-to-mean-flow kinetic energy conversion rate may be reduced significantly.

Abstract

Previous Voyager 1 and 2 Jovian circulation measurements exhibit a large positive correlation between eddy momentum transports and the meridional shear of the zonal wind component, implying a very large rate of conversion of eddy kinetic energy into kinetic energy of the zonal jets. Examination of the vectors mainly responsible for the correlation in our recent Voyager 2 global measurements indicates that it is probably caused by a biased sampling of prominent cloud features associated with circulating eddies. Intensive diagnostic measurements with more nearly uniform spatial sampling show no significant correlation in regions where our original measurements showed strong correlations. If the sampling bias mechanism is fully accounted for in all Jovian circulation measurements, the estimated eddy-to-mean-flow kinetic energy conversion rate may be reduced significantly.

Save