A Study on Radiative Damping of Planetary Waves Utilizing Stratospheric Observations

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  • 1 Commission of the European Communities, 1049 Brussels, Belgium
  • | 2 Science and Technology Corporation, Hampton, Virginia 23666
  • | 3 Atmospheric Sciences Division, NASA-Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23665
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Abstract

Satellite ozone observations made by the Stratospheric Aerossol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) and corresponding meteorological temperature data are used to study the radiative damping processes associated with planetary waves during stratospheric warmings. Ramanathan's model has been adapted fox. the radiative heating and cooling calculations. The derived infrared damping coefficients, based on observed stratospheric ozone and temperature, are compared with the Newtonian cooling coefficients of Dickinson and Fels. It is also shown that the negative correlation between temperature and ozone solar heating in the upper stratosphere accelerates the damping rate due to infrared cooling alone, in agreement with the theoretical analysis and an earlier report based on observations. In addition, it is also found in this analysis that the phase relationship between ozone and solar heating waves is characterized by its behavior in three distinct layers. In the regions above about 2 mb and also below about 10 mb, the waves are closely in-phase. Between approximately 2 and 10 mb, they show a departure from the in-phase relationship which can be attributed to the so-called “opacity effect.” This effect significantly determines the magnitude of radiative damping.

Abstract

Satellite ozone observations made by the Stratospheric Aerossol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) and corresponding meteorological temperature data are used to study the radiative damping processes associated with planetary waves during stratospheric warmings. Ramanathan's model has been adapted fox. the radiative heating and cooling calculations. The derived infrared damping coefficients, based on observed stratospheric ozone and temperature, are compared with the Newtonian cooling coefficients of Dickinson and Fels. It is also shown that the negative correlation between temperature and ozone solar heating in the upper stratosphere accelerates the damping rate due to infrared cooling alone, in agreement with the theoretical analysis and an earlier report based on observations. In addition, it is also found in this analysis that the phase relationship between ozone and solar heating waves is characterized by its behavior in three distinct layers. In the regions above about 2 mb and also below about 10 mb, the waves are closely in-phase. Between approximately 2 and 10 mb, they show a departure from the in-phase relationship which can be attributed to the so-called “opacity effect.” This effect significantly determines the magnitude of radiative damping.

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