Measurements of Axial Pressures in Tornado-like Vortices

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  • 1 Department of Aeronautics, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
  • | 2 Department of Geosciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907
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Abstract

The results of a series of measurements of centerline pressure deficit in tornado-like vortices are described. These measurements were undertaken for the purpose of determining 1) how the magnitude of the central pressure deficit in a columnar vortex varies with height, and 2) what functional relationships exist between them deficits and the dynamic and geometric parameters characterizing the flow. The results graphically show the complicated variation of central pressure deficit with height in both laminar and turbulent vortices In low-swirl vortices, the largest deficits are found aloft, not at surface. Further, the low-swirl vortices have generally greater central pressure deficits than moderate-swirl events. The greatest deficits are tied to the approach of the vortex breakdown to the lower surface. The data also indicate a cubic dependence of the central pressure deficit on applied circulation.

Abstract

The results of a series of measurements of centerline pressure deficit in tornado-like vortices are described. These measurements were undertaken for the purpose of determining 1) how the magnitude of the central pressure deficit in a columnar vortex varies with height, and 2) what functional relationships exist between them deficits and the dynamic and geometric parameters characterizing the flow. The results graphically show the complicated variation of central pressure deficit with height in both laminar and turbulent vortices In low-swirl vortices, the largest deficits are found aloft, not at surface. Further, the low-swirl vortices have generally greater central pressure deficits than moderate-swirl events. The greatest deficits are tied to the approach of the vortex breakdown to the lower surface. The data also indicate a cubic dependence of the central pressure deficit on applied circulation.

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