Can Dryline Mixing Create Buoyancy?

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  • 1 University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma
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Abstract

Thermodynamic analysis indicates, in contradiction to an earlier hypothesis, that a mixture of warm, dry air and cool, moist air on opposite sides of a dryline will have a slightly lower virtual temperature than the average of its components. Such mixing is unlikely, therefore, to contribute directly to dryline convection or maintenance. The correction is due to consideration of the effect of moisture content on specific heat, the neglect of which could lead to significant errors in numerical simulation models.

Abstract

Thermodynamic analysis indicates, in contradiction to an earlier hypothesis, that a mixture of warm, dry air and cool, moist air on opposite sides of a dryline will have a slightly lower virtual temperature than the average of its components. Such mixing is unlikely, therefore, to contribute directly to dryline convection or maintenance. The correction is due to consideration of the effect of moisture content on specific heat, the neglect of which could lead to significant errors in numerical simulation models.

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