A Theoretical investigation of the Effects of Sinusoidal Topography on Particle Deposition

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  • 1 Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina
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Abstract

Trajectories of 500- and 1000-μm diameter particles are calculated as they fall through the spatially varying flow field above sinusoidal terrain for various combinations of atmospheric stability, wind speed, and terrain wavelength. In each case, a set of 20 uniformly spaced particles are released simultaneously above sinusoidal topography and their trajectories are obtained numerically by coupling a linear wave solution for flow over sinusoidal topography with equations for particle motion. The flow field and the associated patterns of deposition are shown to be strongly influenced by atmospheric stratification. For strong stratification, the presence of vertically propagating waves produces relatively concentrated “particle streams.” For less stratified conditions with evanescent waves, little focusing of particle trajectories is apparent. The ability of the atmosphere to focus or concentrate falling particles may ultimately produce regions along the surface with enhanced deposition.

Abstract

Trajectories of 500- and 1000-μm diameter particles are calculated as they fall through the spatially varying flow field above sinusoidal terrain for various combinations of atmospheric stability, wind speed, and terrain wavelength. In each case, a set of 20 uniformly spaced particles are released simultaneously above sinusoidal topography and their trajectories are obtained numerically by coupling a linear wave solution for flow over sinusoidal topography with equations for particle motion. The flow field and the associated patterns of deposition are shown to be strongly influenced by atmospheric stratification. For strong stratification, the presence of vertically propagating waves produces relatively concentrated “particle streams.” For less stratified conditions with evanescent waves, little focusing of particle trajectories is apparent. The ability of the atmosphere to focus or concentrate falling particles may ultimately produce regions along the surface with enhanced deposition.

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