A Fourier–Riccati Approach to Radiative Transfer. Part I: Foundations

View More View Less
  • 1 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
© Get Permissions
Full access

Abstract

The three-dimensional equation of radiative transfer is formally solved using a Fourier-Riccati approach while calculations are performed on cloudy media embedded in a two-dimensional space. An extension to Stephens’ work, this study addresses the coupling between space and angle asserted by the equation of transfer. In particular, the accuracy of the computed radiation field as it is influenced by the angular resolution of the phase function and spatial discretization of the cloudy medium is discussed. The necessity of using a large number of quadrature points to calculate fluxes even when the phase function is isotropic for media exhibiting vertical and horizontal inhomogeneities is demonstrated. Effects of incorrect spatial sampling on both radiance and flux fields are also quantified by example. Radiance and flux comparisons obtained by the Fourier-Riccati model and the independent pixel approximation for inhomogeneous cloudy media illustrate the inadequacy of the latter even for tenuous clouds.

Abstract

The three-dimensional equation of radiative transfer is formally solved using a Fourier-Riccati approach while calculations are performed on cloudy media embedded in a two-dimensional space. An extension to Stephens’ work, this study addresses the coupling between space and angle asserted by the equation of transfer. In particular, the accuracy of the computed radiation field as it is influenced by the angular resolution of the phase function and spatial discretization of the cloudy medium is discussed. The necessity of using a large number of quadrature points to calculate fluxes even when the phase function is isotropic for media exhibiting vertical and horizontal inhomogeneities is demonstrated. Effects of incorrect spatial sampling on both radiance and flux fields are also quantified by example. Radiance and flux comparisons obtained by the Fourier-Riccati model and the independent pixel approximation for inhomogeneous cloudy media illustrate the inadequacy of the latter even for tenuous clouds.

Save