The Tropical Semiannual Oscillations in Temperature and Ozone as Observed by the MLS

Eric A. Ray Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

Search for other papers by Eric A. Ray in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
James R. Holton Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

Search for other papers by James R. Holton in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Evan F. Fishbein Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California

Search for other papers by Evan F. Fishbein in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Lucien Froidevaux Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California

Search for other papers by Lucien Froidevaux in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
J. W. Waters Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California

Search for other papers by J. W. Waters in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Full access

Abstract

The first two years of MLS temperature and ozone data are used to examine the tropical upper-stratospheric SAO. Time series analysis revealed that the strongest amplitudes of the SAO occurred near the equator at 2 mb for temperature and 5 mb for ozone, consistent with previous observations. The first cycle of each calendar year was observed to have a much higher amplitude than the second cycle except for the warm phase in late 1991. Interannual variability in the strength of the SAO, such as the much stronger warm phase of late 1991 as compared to late 1992, was significant and could be partly attributed to the QBO in zonal wind.

Abstract

The first two years of MLS temperature and ozone data are used to examine the tropical upper-stratospheric SAO. Time series analysis revealed that the strongest amplitudes of the SAO occurred near the equator at 2 mb for temperature and 5 mb for ozone, consistent with previous observations. The first cycle of each calendar year was observed to have a much higher amplitude than the second cycle except for the warm phase in late 1991. Interannual variability in the strength of the SAO, such as the much stronger warm phase of late 1991 as compared to late 1992, was significant and could be partly attributed to the QBO in zonal wind.

Save