The Role of Meteorology in Projects of the Corps of Engineers in the Missouri River Basin

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  • 1 Corps of Engineers, Missouri River Division, Omaha, Nebraska
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The comprehensive plan for the development of water resources of the Missouri River Basin provides for flood control, navigation, electric power generation, irrigation, and other miscellaneous water uses. Of these features the Corps of Engineers is primarily responsible for flood control and for river and harbor developments in the interest of navigation. In the planning, construction, and operation of water control projects to fulfill these primary responsibilities, meteorology plays a very definite and important role.

Meteorology as an art touches the lives of all—as an applied science it affects the plans and actions of numerous organizations which are vitally concerned with the predictability of weather, its variation and extremes. The latter is particularly true in the Corps of Engineers in which weather is one of the basic factors to be considered in the planning, construction, and operation of river development projects.

* Paper read at the St. Louis Meeting, Jan. 6, 1950, in the Symposium on Industrial Meteorology.

The comprehensive plan for the development of water resources of the Missouri River Basin provides for flood control, navigation, electric power generation, irrigation, and other miscellaneous water uses. Of these features the Corps of Engineers is primarily responsible for flood control and for river and harbor developments in the interest of navigation. In the planning, construction, and operation of water control projects to fulfill these primary responsibilities, meteorology plays a very definite and important role.

Meteorology as an art touches the lives of all—as an applied science it affects the plans and actions of numerous organizations which are vitally concerned with the predictability of weather, its variation and extremes. The latter is particularly true in the Corps of Engineers in which weather is one of the basic factors to be considered in the planning, construction, and operation of river development projects.

* Paper read at the St. Louis Meeting, Jan. 6, 1950, in the Symposium on Industrial Meteorology.

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