wind velocity measurements using sonic techniques

View More View Less
  • 1 Submarine Signal Division, Raytheon Company, Newport, R. I.
© Get Permissions
Full access

A unique technique has been devised to measure wind speed and direction in space without any local sensor, artificial target, or any structure erected over the ground being necessary. Continuous recordings of wind speed and direction at a distance of 70 ft from a sonic source have been obtained by measuring the frequency shift of sonic waves scattered from a narrow beam generated by a powerful Levavasseur whistle at 10 kc. Two receivers in orthogonal directions with respect to the source provide continuous readings of the horizontal components of wind velocity. The series of over 300 sonic measurements on winds from 3 to 25 mph show average difference readings compared with an Aerovane anemometer not larger than ± 1.0 mph for speed nor ± 5.0° for direction, indicating a high degree of correlation between the sonic system and the more commonly used propeller type anemometers.

1 This program was conducted under the sponsorship of the Department of the Navy, Bureau of Ships, under Contracts NObs-84140 and NObs-86855 at Radcom Division, Litton Systems, Inc., College Park, Md.

A unique technique has been devised to measure wind speed and direction in space without any local sensor, artificial target, or any structure erected over the ground being necessary. Continuous recordings of wind speed and direction at a distance of 70 ft from a sonic source have been obtained by measuring the frequency shift of sonic waves scattered from a narrow beam generated by a powerful Levavasseur whistle at 10 kc. Two receivers in orthogonal directions with respect to the source provide continuous readings of the horizontal components of wind velocity. The series of over 300 sonic measurements on winds from 3 to 25 mph show average difference readings compared with an Aerovane anemometer not larger than ± 1.0 mph for speed nor ± 5.0° for direction, indicating a high degree of correlation between the sonic system and the more commonly used propeller type anemometers.

1 This program was conducted under the sponsorship of the Department of the Navy, Bureau of Ships, under Contracts NObs-84140 and NObs-86855 at Radcom Division, Litton Systems, Inc., College Park, Md.

Save