a new radar for measuring winds

R. B. Chadwick Wave Propagation Laboratory, NOAA/Environmental Research Laboratories, Boulder, Colo. 80302

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K. P. Moran Wave Propagation Laboratory, NOAA/Environmental Research Laboratories, Boulder, Colo. 80302

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R. G. Strauch Wave Propagation Laboratory, NOAA/Environmental Research Laboratories, Boulder, Colo. 80302

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G. E. Morrison Wave Propagation Laboratory, NOAA/Environmental Research Laboratories, Boulder, Colo. 80302

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W. C. Campbell Wave Propagation Laboratory, NOAA/Environmental Research Laboratories, Boulder, Colo. 80302

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A new radar technique for measuring winds in the lower atmosphere is discussed. It is an extension of the well-known FM-CW technique and has the same advantages of relatively low cost and high flexibility for a clear-air radar. Two different types of wind data from clear-air returns are presented. The first is horizontal wind data by the FM-CW radar; these are compared with winds obtained from a tethered balloon. The second is radial velocities associated with convection cells drifting past the radar. Also, two types of data processing are illustrated. The first is off-line processing of recorded digital data, and the second is real-time processing using a commercial spectrum analyzer.

A new radar technique for measuring winds in the lower atmosphere is discussed. It is an extension of the well-known FM-CW technique and has the same advantages of relatively low cost and high flexibility for a clear-air radar. Two different types of wind data from clear-air returns are presented. The first is horizontal wind data by the FM-CW radar; these are compared with winds obtained from a tethered balloon. The second is radial velocities associated with convection cells drifting past the radar. Also, two types of data processing are illustrated. The first is off-line processing of recorded digital data, and the second is real-time processing using a commercial spectrum analyzer.

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