Aeronautical Meteorology: Progress and Challenges—Today and Tomorrow

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  • 1 Airport Division, Systems Research and Development Service, Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C. 20590
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Weather strongly affects air carrier and general aviation operations and the air traffic control system. Accidents, flight delays, airport operations, and fuel economy are only a few of the more significant factors in air transportation that are affected directly by weather phenomena.

Data on the effect of weather on air transportation are presented. The challenges to the aeronautical meteorologist to meet the demands for service are categorized as: the challenge to “do more with less,” to “prove the value of aviation weather service,” and to provide more “tailored” service. An assessment of today's services and capabilities is given, and the progress in meeting these challenges is outlined briefly.

Challenges of tomorrow to the aeronautical meteorologist are anticipated as not changing from today's challenges; however, a shift in emphasis from the type of service provided today is suggested. The need to highlight techniques of value analyses and a role for the American Meteorological Society in meeting this need are suggested.

1Paper presented at the 57th Annual Meeting of the AMS, 17 January 1977, Tucson, Ariz. The author is Chairman of the AMS Committee on Aeronautical Meteorology.

Weather strongly affects air carrier and general aviation operations and the air traffic control system. Accidents, flight delays, airport operations, and fuel economy are only a few of the more significant factors in air transportation that are affected directly by weather phenomena.

Data on the effect of weather on air transportation are presented. The challenges to the aeronautical meteorologist to meet the demands for service are categorized as: the challenge to “do more with less,” to “prove the value of aviation weather service,” and to provide more “tailored” service. An assessment of today's services and capabilities is given, and the progress in meeting these challenges is outlined briefly.

Challenges of tomorrow to the aeronautical meteorologist are anticipated as not changing from today's challenges; however, a shift in emphasis from the type of service provided today is suggested. The need to highlight techniques of value analyses and a role for the American Meteorological Society in meeting this need are suggested.

1Paper presented at the 57th Annual Meeting of the AMS, 17 January 1977, Tucson, Ariz. The author is Chairman of the AMS Committee on Aeronautical Meteorology.

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