A Contrasting Study of the Rainfall Anomalies between Central Tibet and Central India during the Summer Monsoon Season of 1979

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  • 1 Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing
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Based on a comparison of rainfall anomalies between central India and central Tibet in July and August 1979, a negative correlation between them is found. When an active monsoon prevailed over central India, a break monsoon occurred over central Tibet, and vice versa. The large-scale circulation conditions for an active Indian monsoon are characterized by the presence of a large area of negative height departures over the Indian Peninsula and large areas of positive height departures over central Tibet. On the other hand, the circulation conditions responsible for a break monsoon in India are characterized by frequent wave-trough activity over Tibet and the regions to the west of Tibet, and by a dominating high-pressure area over the Indian Peninsula.

1Dr. C. C. Chang is professor emeritus of the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. For many years he served as chairman of the meteorology department of that university, and as member representative of Catholic University in the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). He is now on an extended research leave to the People's Republic of China as a visiting professor. (Comments by E. R. Reiter.)

Based on a comparison of rainfall anomalies between central India and central Tibet in July and August 1979, a negative correlation between them is found. When an active monsoon prevailed over central India, a break monsoon occurred over central Tibet, and vice versa. The large-scale circulation conditions for an active Indian monsoon are characterized by the presence of a large area of negative height departures over the Indian Peninsula and large areas of positive height departures over central Tibet. On the other hand, the circulation conditions responsible for a break monsoon in India are characterized by frequent wave-trough activity over Tibet and the regions to the west of Tibet, and by a dominating high-pressure area over the Indian Peninsula.

1Dr. C. C. Chang is professor emeritus of the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. For many years he served as chairman of the meteorology department of that university, and as member representative of Catholic University in the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). He is now on an extended research leave to the People's Republic of China as a visiting professor. (Comments by E. R. Reiter.)

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