Stable and Unstable Planetary Waves

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  • 1 Department of Geophysics, Beijing University, Beijing, China
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Originally, the author intended to attack the problem of dynamic effects of the Tibet Plateau on the general circulation of the atmosphere. As the work was progressing, it appeared that the concept of assimilation of space and time had to be introduced. The result was a more general conclusion about the extent of the existence of planetary waves, the coupling of high- and low-level disturbances, and the criteria of space and time baroclinic instability. The classical theory of the baroclinic instability was revised and generalized.

1This is an abbreviated version of a paper submitted to the Journal of Meteorology, Chinese Meteorological Society, on 23 April 1980.

2Prof. Xie Yibing studied at the University of Chicago after World War II and received a Ph.D. degree from that university. To his American colleagues and friends he is better known under the old spelling of his name: Yi-Ping Hsieh. He is Head of the Department of Geophysics and Astronomy of Beijing (Peking) University, Vice-President of the Chinese Meteorological Society, chief editor of Acta Meteorologica Sinica, and Vice-Chairman of the Working Group of Atmospheric Science in the Committee of Science and Technology (President of that committee is Vice-Premier Feng Yi). (Comments by E. R. Reiter.)

Originally, the author intended to attack the problem of dynamic effects of the Tibet Plateau on the general circulation of the atmosphere. As the work was progressing, it appeared that the concept of assimilation of space and time had to be introduced. The result was a more general conclusion about the extent of the existence of planetary waves, the coupling of high- and low-level disturbances, and the criteria of space and time baroclinic instability. The classical theory of the baroclinic instability was revised and generalized.

1This is an abbreviated version of a paper submitted to the Journal of Meteorology, Chinese Meteorological Society, on 23 April 1980.

2Prof. Xie Yibing studied at the University of Chicago after World War II and received a Ph.D. degree from that university. To his American colleagues and friends he is better known under the old spelling of his name: Yi-Ping Hsieh. He is Head of the Department of Geophysics and Astronomy of Beijing (Peking) University, Vice-President of the Chinese Meteorological Society, chief editor of Acta Meteorologica Sinica, and Vice-Chairman of the Working Group of Atmospheric Science in the Committee of Science and Technology (President of that committee is Vice-Premier Feng Yi). (Comments by E. R. Reiter.)

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