First Estimates of the Diurnal Variation of Longwave Radiation from the Multiple-Satellite Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE)

© Get Permissions
Full access

First results for diurnal cycles derived from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are presented for the combined Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and NOAA-9 spacecraft for April 1985. Regional scale longwave (LW) radiation data are analyzed to determine diurnal variations for the total scene (including clouds) and for clear-sky conditions. The LW diurnal range was found to be greatest for clear desert regions (up to about 70 W · m−2) and smallest for clear oceans (less than 5 W · m−2). Local time of maximum longwave radiation occurs at a wide range of times throughout the day and night over oceans, but generally occurs from noon to early afternoon over land and desert regions.

1 Atmospheric Sciences Division, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23665-5225.

2 Planning Research Corporation, Aerospace Technologies Division, Hampton, VA 23666.

3 ERBE Science Team Principal Investigators: B. R. Barkstrom, ERBE experiment scientist and science team leader, Atmospheric Sciences Division, NASA Langley Research Center; R. D. Cess, State University of New York at Stony Brook; Y. Fouquart, LOA, University of Lille, France; A. Gruber, NOAA/NESDIS; D. L. Hartmann, University of Washington; F. B. House, Drexel University; R. S. Kandel, LMD/CNRS, Palaiseau, France; M. D. King, ERBE project scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; A. T. Mecherikunnel, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; A. J. Miller, NOAA/NMC; V. Ramanathan, University of Chicago; J. Coakley, NCAR; E. Raschke, University of Cologne, Germany; G. L. Smith, NASA Langley Research Center; W. L. Smith, University of Wisconsin, Madison; and T. H. Vonder Haar, Colorado State University. A complete listing of ERBE Science Team members is given in Barkstrom (1984).

First results for diurnal cycles derived from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are presented for the combined Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and NOAA-9 spacecraft for April 1985. Regional scale longwave (LW) radiation data are analyzed to determine diurnal variations for the total scene (including clouds) and for clear-sky conditions. The LW diurnal range was found to be greatest for clear desert regions (up to about 70 W · m−2) and smallest for clear oceans (less than 5 W · m−2). Local time of maximum longwave radiation occurs at a wide range of times throughout the day and night over oceans, but generally occurs from noon to early afternoon over land and desert regions.

1 Atmospheric Sciences Division, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23665-5225.

2 Planning Research Corporation, Aerospace Technologies Division, Hampton, VA 23666.

3 ERBE Science Team Principal Investigators: B. R. Barkstrom, ERBE experiment scientist and science team leader, Atmospheric Sciences Division, NASA Langley Research Center; R. D. Cess, State University of New York at Stony Brook; Y. Fouquart, LOA, University of Lille, France; A. Gruber, NOAA/NESDIS; D. L. Hartmann, University of Washington; F. B. House, Drexel University; R. S. Kandel, LMD/CNRS, Palaiseau, France; M. D. King, ERBE project scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; A. T. Mecherikunnel, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; A. J. Miller, NOAA/NMC; V. Ramanathan, University of Chicago; J. Coakley, NCAR; E. Raschke, University of Cologne, Germany; G. L. Smith, NASA Langley Research Center; W. L. Smith, University of Wisconsin, Madison; and T. H. Vonder Haar, Colorado State University. A complete listing of ERBE Science Team members is given in Barkstrom (1984).

Save