Study on Observational Systems: A Review of Meteorological and Oceanographic Education in Observational Techniques and the Relationship to National Facilities and Needs

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Meteorological and oceanographic education in observational techniques and the relationship to national facilities' needs are reviewed. The significance of measurement science and its relationship to national capabilities are examined. Opportunities for the enhancement of national capabilities related to the application of measurement science to meteorology and oceanography are identified and recommendations for action are presented.

Editor's note: The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research and the American Meteorological Society sponsored this study. The body of the report on the study is presented here. The study was performed by a committee consisting of: Robert Serafin, National Center for Atmospheric Research* (chair); Brian Heikes, University of Rhode Island; Douglas Sargeant, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; William Smith, University of Wisconsin; Eugene Takle, Iowa State University; and Roger Wakimoto, University of California at Los Angeles. (Copies of the complete study with its supporting documents, consisting of: a statement from university heads and chairs, a survey on university educational programs and facilities, universities known to have responded to the Survey on Instrumentation and Observation, lists of persons interviewed by the committee, and a minimal set of basic instruments for a meteorology laboratory may be obtained by writing to the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research.)

*The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

Meteorological and oceanographic education in observational techniques and the relationship to national facilities' needs are reviewed. The significance of measurement science and its relationship to national capabilities are examined. Opportunities for the enhancement of national capabilities related to the application of measurement science to meteorology and oceanography are identified and recommendations for action are presented.

Editor's note: The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research and the American Meteorological Society sponsored this study. The body of the report on the study is presented here. The study was performed by a committee consisting of: Robert Serafin, National Center for Atmospheric Research* (chair); Brian Heikes, University of Rhode Island; Douglas Sargeant, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; William Smith, University of Wisconsin; Eugene Takle, Iowa State University; and Roger Wakimoto, University of California at Los Angeles. (Copies of the complete study with its supporting documents, consisting of: a statement from university heads and chairs, a survey on university educational programs and facilities, universities known to have responded to the Survey on Instrumentation and Observation, lists of persons interviewed by the committee, and a minimal set of basic instruments for a meteorology laboratory may be obtained by writing to the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research.)

*The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

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