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Real-Time Guidance Provided by NOAA's Hurricane Research Division to Forecasters during Emily of 1993

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The Hurricane Research Division (HRD) is NOAA's primary component for research on tropical cyclones. In accomplishing research goals, many staff members have developed analysis procedures and forecast models that not only help improve the understanding of hurricane structure, motion, and intensity change, but also provide operational support for forecasters at the National Hurricane Center (NHC). During the 1993 hurricane season, HRD demonstrated three important real-time capabilities for the first time. These achievements included the successful transmission of a series of color radar reflectivity images from the NOAA research aircraft to NHC, the operational availability of objective mesoscale streamline and isotach analyses of a hurricane surface wind field, and the transition of the experimental dropwindsonde program on the periphery of hurricanes to a technology capable of supporting operational requirements. Examples of these and other real-time capabilities are presented for Hurricane Emily.

*Hurricane Research Division/AOML/NOAA, Miami, Florida.

+National Meteorological Center/NWS/NOAA, Camp Springs, Maryland.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Robert Burpee, Environmental Research Laboratories, Hurricane Research Division/NOAA, 4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL33149-1097.

The Hurricane Research Division (HRD) is NOAA's primary component for research on tropical cyclones. In accomplishing research goals, many staff members have developed analysis procedures and forecast models that not only help improve the understanding of hurricane structure, motion, and intensity change, but also provide operational support for forecasters at the National Hurricane Center (NHC). During the 1993 hurricane season, HRD demonstrated three important real-time capabilities for the first time. These achievements included the successful transmission of a series of color radar reflectivity images from the NOAA research aircraft to NHC, the operational availability of objective mesoscale streamline and isotach analyses of a hurricane surface wind field, and the transition of the experimental dropwindsonde program on the periphery of hurricanes to a technology capable of supporting operational requirements. Examples of these and other real-time capabilities are presented for Hurricane Emily.

*Hurricane Research Division/AOML/NOAA, Miami, Florida.

+National Meteorological Center/NWS/NOAA, Camp Springs, Maryland.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Robert Burpee, Environmental Research Laboratories, Hurricane Research Division/NOAA, 4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL33149-1097.
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