Survey of Graduate Degree Procedures in Atmospheric Sciences

Roland Stull
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Steven Businger
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To document the inner workings of graduate degree programs, the authors surveyed the 67 American and Canadian universities that grant Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) and/or Master of Science (M.S.) degrees in the atmospheric sciences and related fields. Topics included (a) admission standards such as graduate record exam scores and grade point averages; (b) start-up issues such as course requirements and computer programming skills; (c) M.S. attributes such as thesis length, years until graduation, and thesis versus nonthesis options; (d) Ph.D. procedures such as exam sequences and timing, thesis page length, workplace ethics and teamwork, and development of teaching skills; and (e) employment after graduation. This information could aid university departments in their future program planning.

*Atmospheric Science Programme, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

+Department of Meteorology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii.

Corresponding author address: Roland B. Stull, Atmospheric Science Programme, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, 1984 West Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1TZ, Canada. E-mail: rstull@geog.ubc.ca

To document the inner workings of graduate degree programs, the authors surveyed the 67 American and Canadian universities that grant Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) and/or Master of Science (M.S.) degrees in the atmospheric sciences and related fields. Topics included (a) admission standards such as graduate record exam scores and grade point averages; (b) start-up issues such as course requirements and computer programming skills; (c) M.S. attributes such as thesis length, years until graduation, and thesis versus nonthesis options; (d) Ph.D. procedures such as exam sequences and timing, thesis page length, workplace ethics and teamwork, and development of teaching skills; and (e) employment after graduation. This information could aid university departments in their future program planning.

*Atmospheric Science Programme, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

+Department of Meteorology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii.

Corresponding author address: Roland B. Stull, Atmospheric Science Programme, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, 1984 West Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1TZ, Canada. E-mail: rstull@geog.ubc.ca
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