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The Coastal Observation and Simulation with Topography (COAST) Experiment

Nicholas A. Bond
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Clifford F. Mass
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Bradley F. Smull
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Robert A. Houze
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Ming-Jen Yang
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Brian A. Colle
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Scott A. Braun
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M. A. Shapiro
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Bradley R. Colman
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Paul J. Neiman
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James E. Overland
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William D. Neff
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James D. Doyle
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The Coastal Observation and Simulation with Topography (COAST) program has examined the interaction of both steady-state and transient cool-season synoptic features, such as fronts and cyclones, with the coastal terrain of western North America. Its objectives include better understanding and forecasting of landfalling weather systems and, in particular, the modification and creation of mesoscale structures by coastal orography. In addition, COAST has placed considerable emphasis on the evaluation of mesoscale models in coastal terrain. These goals have been addressed through case studies of storm and frontal landfall along the Pacific Northwest coast using special field observations from a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration WP-3D research aircraft and simulations from high-resolution numerical models. The field work was conducted during December 1993 and December 1995. Active weather conditions encompassing a variety of synoptic situations were sampled. This article presents an overview of the program as well as highlights from a sample of completed and ongoing case studies.

aJISAO, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

bDepartment of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

cNOAA/NSSL, Norman, Oklahoma.

dCentral Weather Bureau, Taipei, Taiwan.

eNCAR, Boulder, Colorado.

fNOAA/ETL, Boulder, Colorado.

gNational Weather Service, Seattle, Washington.

hNOAA/PMEL, Seattle, Washington.

iNaval Research Laboratory, Monterey, California.

Corresponding author address: Dr. N. A. Bond, NOAA/PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way N.E., Seattle, WA 98115-0070. E-mail: bond@pmel.noaa.gov

*NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Contribution No. 1804 and Joint Institute for the Study of the Ocean and Atmosphere Contribution No. 421.

The Coastal Observation and Simulation with Topography (COAST) program has examined the interaction of both steady-state and transient cool-season synoptic features, such as fronts and cyclones, with the coastal terrain of western North America. Its objectives include better understanding and forecasting of landfalling weather systems and, in particular, the modification and creation of mesoscale structures by coastal orography. In addition, COAST has placed considerable emphasis on the evaluation of mesoscale models in coastal terrain. These goals have been addressed through case studies of storm and frontal landfall along the Pacific Northwest coast using special field observations from a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration WP-3D research aircraft and simulations from high-resolution numerical models. The field work was conducted during December 1993 and December 1995. Active weather conditions encompassing a variety of synoptic situations were sampled. This article presents an overview of the program as well as highlights from a sample of completed and ongoing case studies.

aJISAO, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

bDepartment of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

cNOAA/NSSL, Norman, Oklahoma.

dCentral Weather Bureau, Taipei, Taiwan.

eNCAR, Boulder, Colorado.

fNOAA/ETL, Boulder, Colorado.

gNational Weather Service, Seattle, Washington.

hNOAA/PMEL, Seattle, Washington.

iNaval Research Laboratory, Monterey, California.

Corresponding author address: Dr. N. A. Bond, NOAA/PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way N.E., Seattle, WA 98115-0070. E-mail: bond@pmel.noaa.gov

*NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Contribution No. 1804 and Joint Institute for the Study of the Ocean and Atmosphere Contribution No. 421.

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