All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 268 54 10
PDF Downloads 68 29 6

Highlights of Coastal Waves 1996

David P. Rogers
Search for other papers by David P. Rogers in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Clive E. Dorman
Search for other papers by Clive E. Dorman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Kathleen A. Edwards
Search for other papers by Kathleen A. Edwards in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Ian M. Brooks
Search for other papers by Ian M. Brooks in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
W. Kendall Melville
Search for other papers by W. Kendall Melville in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Stephen D. Burk
Search for other papers by Stephen D. Burk in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
William T. Thompson
Search for other papers by William T. Thompson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Teddy Holt
Search for other papers by Teddy Holt in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Linda M. Ström
Search for other papers by Linda M. Ström in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Michael Tjernström
Search for other papers by Michael Tjernström in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Branko Grisogono
Search for other papers by Branko Grisogono in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
John M. Bane
Search for other papers by John M. Bane in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Wendell A. Nuss
Search for other papers by Wendell A. Nuss in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Bruce M. Morley
Search for other papers by Bruce M. Morley in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Allen J. Schanot
Search for other papers by Allen J. Schanot in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Full access

Some of the highlights of an experiment designed to study coastal atmospheric phenomena along the California coast (Coastal Waves 1996 experiment) are described. This study was designed to address several problems, including the cross-shore variability and turbulent structure of the marine boundary layer, the influence of the coast on the development of the marine layer and clouds, the ageostrophy of the flow, the dynamics of trapped events, the parameterization of surface fluxes, and the supercriticality of the marine layer.

Based in Monterey, California, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) C-130 Hercules and the University of North Carolina Piper Seneca obtained a comprehensive set of measurements on the structure of the marine layer. The study focused on the effects of prominent topographic features on the wind. Downstream of capes and points, narrow bands of high winds are frequently encountered. The NCAR-designed Scanning Aerosol Backscatter Lidar (SABL) provided a unique opportunity to connect changes in the depth of the boundary layer with specific features in the dynamics of the flow field.

An integral part of the experiment was the use of numerical models as forecast and diagnostic tools. The Naval Research Laboratory's Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Model System (COAMPS) provided high-resolution forecasts of the wind field in the vicinity of capes and points, which aided the deployment of the aircraft. Subsequently, this model and the MIUU (University of Uppsala) numerical model were used to support the analysis of the field data.

These are some of the most comprehensive measurements of the topographically forced marine layer that have been collected. SABL proved to be an exceptionally useful tool to resolve the small-scale structure of the boundary layer and, combined with in situ turbulence measurements, provides new insight into the structure of the marine atmosphere. Measurements were made sufficiently far offshore to distinguish between the coastal and open ocean effects. COAMPS proved to be an excellent forecast tool and both it and the MIUU model are integral parts of the ongoing analysis. The results highlight the large spatial variability that occurs directly in response to topographic effects. Routine measurements are insufficient to resolve this variability. Numerical weather prediction model boundary conditions cannot properly define the forecast system and often underestimate the wind speed and surface wave conditions in the nearshore region.

This study was a collaborative effort between the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration.

*Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, California.

+Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, California.

#Department of Meteorology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

@University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

&Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California.

**Research Aviation Facility, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado.

Corresponding author address: Dr. David P. Rogers, Physical Oceanography Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0230.

Some of the highlights of an experiment designed to study coastal atmospheric phenomena along the California coast (Coastal Waves 1996 experiment) are described. This study was designed to address several problems, including the cross-shore variability and turbulent structure of the marine boundary layer, the influence of the coast on the development of the marine layer and clouds, the ageostrophy of the flow, the dynamics of trapped events, the parameterization of surface fluxes, and the supercriticality of the marine layer.

Based in Monterey, California, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) C-130 Hercules and the University of North Carolina Piper Seneca obtained a comprehensive set of measurements on the structure of the marine layer. The study focused on the effects of prominent topographic features on the wind. Downstream of capes and points, narrow bands of high winds are frequently encountered. The NCAR-designed Scanning Aerosol Backscatter Lidar (SABL) provided a unique opportunity to connect changes in the depth of the boundary layer with specific features in the dynamics of the flow field.

An integral part of the experiment was the use of numerical models as forecast and diagnostic tools. The Naval Research Laboratory's Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Model System (COAMPS) provided high-resolution forecasts of the wind field in the vicinity of capes and points, which aided the deployment of the aircraft. Subsequently, this model and the MIUU (University of Uppsala) numerical model were used to support the analysis of the field data.

These are some of the most comprehensive measurements of the topographically forced marine layer that have been collected. SABL proved to be an exceptionally useful tool to resolve the small-scale structure of the boundary layer and, combined with in situ turbulence measurements, provides new insight into the structure of the marine atmosphere. Measurements were made sufficiently far offshore to distinguish between the coastal and open ocean effects. COAMPS proved to be an excellent forecast tool and both it and the MIUU model are integral parts of the ongoing analysis. The results highlight the large spatial variability that occurs directly in response to topographic effects. Routine measurements are insufficient to resolve this variability. Numerical weather prediction model boundary conditions cannot properly define the forecast system and often underestimate the wind speed and surface wave conditions in the nearshore region.

This study was a collaborative effort between the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration.

*Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, California.

+Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, California.

#Department of Meteorology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

@University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

&Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California.

**Research Aviation Facility, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado.

Corresponding author address: Dr. David P. Rogers, Physical Oceanography Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0230.
Save