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Land–Atmosphere Interaction Research, Early Results, and Opportunities in the Walnut River Watershed in Southeast Kansas: CASES and ABLE

Margaret A. LeMone
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Robert L. Grossman
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Richard L. Coulter
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Marvin L. Wesley
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Gerard E. Klazura
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Gregory S. PouIos
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William Blumen
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Julie K. Lundquist
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Richard H. Cuenca
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Shaun F. Kelly
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Edward A. Brandes
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Steven P. Oncley
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Robert T. McMillen
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Bruce B. Hicks
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This paper describes the development of the Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES), its synergism with the development of the Atmosphere Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) and related efforts, CASES field programs, some early results, and future plans and opportunities. CASES is a grassroots multidisciplinary effort to study the interaction of the lower atmosphere with the land surface, the subsurface, and vegetation over timescales ranging from nearly instantaneous to years. CASES scientists developed a consensus that observations should be taken in a watershed between 50 and 100 km across; practical considerations led to an approach combining long-term data collection with episodic intensive field campaigns addressing specific objectives that should always include improvement of the design of the long-term instrumentation. In 1997, long-term measurements were initiated in the Walnut River Watershed east of Wichita, Kansas. Argonne National Laboratory started setting up the ABLE array. The first of the long-term hydrological enhancements was installed starting in May by the Hydrologic Science Team of Oregon State University. CASES-97, the first episodic field effort, was held during April–June to study the role of surface processes in the diurnal variation of the boundary layer, to test radar precipitation algorithms, and to define relevant scaling for precipitation and soil properties. The second episodic experiment, CASES-99, was conducted during October 1999, and focused on the stable boundary layer. Enhancements to both the atmospheric and hydrological arrays continue. The data from and information regarding both the long-term and episodic experiments are available on the World Wide Web. Scientists are invited to use the data and to consider the Walnut River Watershed for future field programs.

*,##National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado.

+Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado.

#Environmental Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois.

@Colorado Research Associates, Boulder, Colorado.

&Department of Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon.

**NOAA/Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

++NOAA/Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Silver Spring, Maryland.

##NCAR is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Margaret A. LeMone, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307. E-mail: lemone@ucar.edu

This paper describes the development of the Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES), its synergism with the development of the Atmosphere Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) and related efforts, CASES field programs, some early results, and future plans and opportunities. CASES is a grassroots multidisciplinary effort to study the interaction of the lower atmosphere with the land surface, the subsurface, and vegetation over timescales ranging from nearly instantaneous to years. CASES scientists developed a consensus that observations should be taken in a watershed between 50 and 100 km across; practical considerations led to an approach combining long-term data collection with episodic intensive field campaigns addressing specific objectives that should always include improvement of the design of the long-term instrumentation. In 1997, long-term measurements were initiated in the Walnut River Watershed east of Wichita, Kansas. Argonne National Laboratory started setting up the ABLE array. The first of the long-term hydrological enhancements was installed starting in May by the Hydrologic Science Team of Oregon State University. CASES-97, the first episodic field effort, was held during April–June to study the role of surface processes in the diurnal variation of the boundary layer, to test radar precipitation algorithms, and to define relevant scaling for precipitation and soil properties. The second episodic experiment, CASES-99, was conducted during October 1999, and focused on the stable boundary layer. Enhancements to both the atmospheric and hydrological arrays continue. The data from and information regarding both the long-term and episodic experiments are available on the World Wide Web. Scientists are invited to use the data and to consider the Walnut River Watershed for future field programs.

*,##National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado.

+Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado.

#Environmental Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois.

@Colorado Research Associates, Boulder, Colorado.

&Department of Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon.

**NOAA/Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

++NOAA/Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Silver Spring, Maryland.

##NCAR is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Margaret A. LeMone, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307. E-mail: lemone@ucar.edu
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