How Can We Advance Our Weather and Climate Models as a Community?

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A common modeling infrastructure ad hoc working group evolved from an NSF/NCEP workshop in 1998, in recognition of the need for the climate and weather modeling communities to develop a more organized approach to building the software that underlies modeling and data analyses. With its significant investment of pro bono time, the working group made the first steps in this direction. It suggested standards for model data and model physics and explored the concept of a modeling software framework. An overall software infrastructure would facilitate separation of the scientific and computational aspects of comprehensive models. Consequently, it would allow otherwise isolated scientists to effectively contribute to core U.S. modeling activities, and would provide a larger market to computational scientists and computer vendors, hence encouraging their support.

School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia

International Research Institute for Climate Prediction, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, New York

NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey

National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado

Naval Research Laboratory, Marine Meteorological Division, Monterey, California

NOAA/National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Boulder, Colorado

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland

Climate and Radiation Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland

Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. Robert E. Dickinson, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, 221 Bobby Dodd Way, Atlanta, GA 30332-0340, E-mail: robted@eas.gatech.edu

A common modeling infrastructure ad hoc working group evolved from an NSF/NCEP workshop in 1998, in recognition of the need for the climate and weather modeling communities to develop a more organized approach to building the software that underlies modeling and data analyses. With its significant investment of pro bono time, the working group made the first steps in this direction. It suggested standards for model data and model physics and explored the concept of a modeling software framework. An overall software infrastructure would facilitate separation of the scientific and computational aspects of comprehensive models. Consequently, it would allow otherwise isolated scientists to effectively contribute to core U.S. modeling activities, and would provide a larger market to computational scientists and computer vendors, hence encouraging their support.

School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia

International Research Institute for Climate Prediction, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, New York

NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey

National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado

Naval Research Laboratory, Marine Meteorological Division, Monterey, California

NOAA/National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Boulder, Colorado

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland

Climate and Radiation Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland

Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. Robert E. Dickinson, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, 221 Bobby Dodd Way, Atlanta, GA 30332-0340, E-mail: robted@eas.gatech.edu
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