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CREATING CLIMATE REFERENCE DATASETS

CARDS Workshop on Adjusting Radiosonde Temperature Data for Climate Monitoring

Melissa Free
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Imke Durre
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Enric Aguilar
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Dian Seidel
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Thomas C. Peterson
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Robert E. Eskridge
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James K. Luers
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David Parker
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Margaret Gordon
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John Lanzante
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Stephen Klein
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John Christy
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Steven Schroeder
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Brian Soden
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Larry M. McMillin
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Elizabeth Weatherhead
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Homogeneous upper-air temperature time series are necessary for climate change detection and attribution. About 20 participants met at the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, North Carolina on 11–12 October 2000 to discuss methods of adjusting radiosonde data for inhomogeneities arising from instrument and other changes. Representatives of several research groups described their methods for identifying change points and adjusting temperature time series and compared the results of applying these methods to data from 12 radiosonde stations. The limited agreement among these results and the potential impact of these adjustments on upper-air trends estimates indicate a need for further work in this area and for greater attention to homogeneity issues in planning future changes in radiosonde observations.

NOAA/Air Resources Laboratory, Silver Spring, Maryland

NOAA/National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina

NOAA/National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina and Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain

University of Dayton Research Institute, Dayton, Ohio

Hadley Centre, Met Office, Bracknell, United Kingdom

NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey

University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama

Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas

NOAA/National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, Camp Springs, Maryland

Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. Melissa Free, Air Resources Laboratory (R/ARL), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, SSMC3, Room 3151, 1315 East–West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910 E-mail: melissa.free@noaa.gov

Homogeneous upper-air temperature time series are necessary for climate change detection and attribution. About 20 participants met at the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, North Carolina on 11–12 October 2000 to discuss methods of adjusting radiosonde data for inhomogeneities arising from instrument and other changes. Representatives of several research groups described their methods for identifying change points and adjusting temperature time series and compared the results of applying these methods to data from 12 radiosonde stations. The limited agreement among these results and the potential impact of these adjustments on upper-air trends estimates indicate a need for further work in this area and for greater attention to homogeneity issues in planning future changes in radiosonde observations.

NOAA/Air Resources Laboratory, Silver Spring, Maryland

NOAA/National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina

NOAA/National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina and Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain

University of Dayton Research Institute, Dayton, Ohio

Hadley Centre, Met Office, Bracknell, United Kingdom

NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey

University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama

Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas

NOAA/National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, Camp Springs, Maryland

Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. Melissa Free, Air Resources Laboratory (R/ARL), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, SSMC3, Room 3151, 1315 East–West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910 E-mail: melissa.free@noaa.gov
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