ROLLS, STREETS, WAVES, AND MORE

A Review of Quasi-Two-Dimensional Structures in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

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The atmospheric boundary layer is home to a number of horizontally elongated quasi-two-dimensional phenomena including cloud streets, roll vortices, thermal waves, and surface layer streaks. These phenomena, their dynamics, and their interactions are explored via a review of the literature. Making a clear distinction between the various quasi-two-dimensional phenomena allows improved synthesis of previous results and a better understanding of the interrelationships between phenomena.

Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania

Atmospheric Environment Section, Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, Illinois, and Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois

South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, South Dakota

Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

An amplified discussion of this topic is available online (DOI: 110.1175/BAMS-83-7-Young). For current information see http://dx.doi.org/110.1175/BAMS-83-7-Young.

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. George S. Young, Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, 503 Walker Building, University Park, PA 16802, E-mail: young@ems.psu.edu

The atmospheric boundary layer is home to a number of horizontally elongated quasi-two-dimensional phenomena including cloud streets, roll vortices, thermal waves, and surface layer streaks. These phenomena, their dynamics, and their interactions are explored via a review of the literature. Making a clear distinction between the various quasi-two-dimensional phenomena allows improved synthesis of previous results and a better understanding of the interrelationships between phenomena.

Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania

Atmospheric Environment Section, Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, Illinois, and Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois

South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, South Dakota

Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

An amplified discussion of this topic is available online (DOI: 110.1175/BAMS-83-7-Young). For current information see http://dx.doi.org/110.1175/BAMS-83-7-Young.

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. George S. Young, Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, 503 Walker Building, University Park, PA 16802, E-mail: young@ems.psu.edu
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