OOISHI'S OBSERVATION

Viewed in the Context of Jet Stream Discovery

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Although aircraft encounters with strong westerly winds during World War II provided the stimulus for postwar research on the jet stream, Wasaburo Ooishi observed these winds in the 1920s. Ooishi's work is reviewed in the context of earlier work in upper-air observation and postwar work on the jet stream. An effort is made to reconstruct Ooishi's path to the directorship of Japan's first upper-air observatory by reliance on historical studies and memoirs from the Central Meteorological Observatory.

Archival records from Japan's Aerological Observatory have been used to document Ooishi's upper-air observations. The first official report from the observatory (written in 1926 and in the auxiliary language of Esperanto) assumes a central role in the study. In this report, data are stratified by season and used to produce the mean seasonal wind profiles. The profile for winter gives the first known evidence of the persistent strong westerlies over Japan that would later become known as the jet stream.

National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma, and Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: John M. Lewis, Desert Research Institute, 2215 Raggio Parkway, Reno, NV 89512-1095, E-mail: jlewis@dri.edu

Although aircraft encounters with strong westerly winds during World War II provided the stimulus for postwar research on the jet stream, Wasaburo Ooishi observed these winds in the 1920s. Ooishi's work is reviewed in the context of earlier work in upper-air observation and postwar work on the jet stream. An effort is made to reconstruct Ooishi's path to the directorship of Japan's first upper-air observatory by reliance on historical studies and memoirs from the Central Meteorological Observatory.

Archival records from Japan's Aerological Observatory have been used to document Ooishi's upper-air observations. The first official report from the observatory (written in 1926 and in the auxiliary language of Esperanto) assumes a central role in the study. In this report, data are stratified by season and used to produce the mean seasonal wind profiles. The profile for winter gives the first known evidence of the persistent strong westerlies over Japan that would later become known as the jet stream.

National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma, and Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: John M. Lewis, Desert Research Institute, 2215 Raggio Parkway, Reno, NV 89512-1095, E-mail: jlewis@dri.edu
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