Estimating Land Surface Energy Budgets From Space: Review and Current Efforts at the University of Wisconsin—Madison and USDA–ARS

George R. Diak
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John R. Mecikalski
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Martha C. Anderson
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John M. Norman
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William P. Kustas
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Ryan D. Torn
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Rebecca L. DeWolf
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Since the advent of the meteorological satellite, a large research effort within the community of earth scientists has been directed at assessing the components of the land surface energy balance from space. The development of these techniques from first efforts to the present time are reviewed, and the integrated system used to estimate the radiative and turbulent land surface fluxes is described. This system is now running in real time over the continental United States at a resolution of 10 km, producing daily and time-integrated flux components.

Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, Wisconsin

Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, and Department of Soil Science, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, Wisconsin

Department of Soil Science, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, Wisconsin

U.S. Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, Maryland

Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington—Seattle, Seattle, Washington

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. John R. Mecikalski, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1225 West Dayton St., Madison, WI 53706-1695, E-mail: john.mecikalski@ssec.wisc.edu

Since the advent of the meteorological satellite, a large research effort within the community of earth scientists has been directed at assessing the components of the land surface energy balance from space. The development of these techniques from first efforts to the present time are reviewed, and the integrated system used to estimate the radiative and turbulent land surface fluxes is described. This system is now running in real time over the continental United States at a resolution of 10 km, producing daily and time-integrated flux components.

Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, Wisconsin

Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, and Department of Soil Science, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, Wisconsin

Department of Soil Science, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, Wisconsin

U.S. Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, Maryland

Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington—Seattle, Seattle, Washington

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. John R. Mecikalski, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1225 West Dayton St., Madison, WI 53706-1695, E-mail: john.mecikalski@ssec.wisc.edu
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