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ACE-ASIA: Regional Climatic and Atmospheric Chemical Effects of Asian Dust and Pollution

John H. Seinfeld
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Gregory R. Carmichael
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Richard Arimoto
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William C. Conant
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Frederick J. Brechtel
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Timothy S. Bates
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Thomas A. Cahill
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Antony D. Clarke
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Sarah J. Doherty
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Piotr J. Flatau
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Barry J. Huebert
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Jiyoung Kim
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Krzysztof M. Markowicz
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Patricia K. Quinn
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Lynn M. Russell
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Philip B. Russell
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Atsushi Shimizu
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Yohei Shinozuka
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Chul H. Song
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Youhua Tang
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Itsushi Uno
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Andrew M. Vogelmann
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Rodney J. Weber
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Jung-Hun Woo
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Xiao Y. Zhang
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Although continental-scale plumes of Asian dust and pollution reduce the amount of solar radiation reaching the earth's surface and perturb the chemistry of the atmosphere, our ability to quantify these effects has been limited by a lack of critical observations, particularly of layers above the surface. Comprehensive surface, airborne, shipboard, and satellite measurements of Asian aerosol chemical composition, size, optical properties, and radiative impacts were performed during the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) study. Measurements within a massive Chinese dust storm at numerous widely spaced sampling locations revealed the highly complex structure of the atmosphere, in which layers of dust, urban pollution, and biomass- burning smoke may be transported long distances as distinct entities or mixed together. The data allow a first-time assessment of the regional climatic and atmospheric chemical effects of a continental-scale mixture of dust and pollution. Our results show that radiative flux reductions during such episodes are sufficient to cause regional climate change.

Departments of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Science and Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California

College of Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa

CEMRC, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico

Brechtel Manufacturing, Inc., Hayward, California

NOAA Pacific Marine and Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, Washington

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Davis, Davis, California

Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii

Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Oceans, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, California

Meteorology Research Institute/KMA, Seoul, Korea

Institute of Geophysics, Warsaw University, Warsaw, Poland

Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California

NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California

National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan

Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan

School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia

Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, China

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. John H. Seinfeld, Mail Code 210-41, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, E-mail: seinfeld@caltech.edu

Although continental-scale plumes of Asian dust and pollution reduce the amount of solar radiation reaching the earth's surface and perturb the chemistry of the atmosphere, our ability to quantify these effects has been limited by a lack of critical observations, particularly of layers above the surface. Comprehensive surface, airborne, shipboard, and satellite measurements of Asian aerosol chemical composition, size, optical properties, and radiative impacts were performed during the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) study. Measurements within a massive Chinese dust storm at numerous widely spaced sampling locations revealed the highly complex structure of the atmosphere, in which layers of dust, urban pollution, and biomass- burning smoke may be transported long distances as distinct entities or mixed together. The data allow a first-time assessment of the regional climatic and atmospheric chemical effects of a continental-scale mixture of dust and pollution. Our results show that radiative flux reductions during such episodes are sufficient to cause regional climate change.

Departments of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Science and Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California

College of Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa

CEMRC, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico

Brechtel Manufacturing, Inc., Hayward, California

NOAA Pacific Marine and Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, Washington

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Davis, Davis, California

Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii

Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Oceans, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, California

Meteorology Research Institute/KMA, Seoul, Korea

Institute of Geophysics, Warsaw University, Warsaw, Poland

Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California

NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California

National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan

Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan

School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia

Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, China

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. John H. Seinfeld, Mail Code 210-41, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, E-mail: seinfeld@caltech.edu
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