NOAA'S ADVANCED HYDROLOGIC PREDICTION SERVICE

Building Pathways for Better Science in Water Forecasting

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The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) program was established to meet our nation's need for more precise flash-flood forecast information. AHPS uses NOAA investments in remote sensing, precipitation forecasts, climate predictions, data automation, hydrologic science, and operational forecast system technologies. AHPS establishes a pathway for the infusion of new verified science and technology, and expands the use of NWS climate, weather, and water analyses and information products. State-of-the-art science is used for improved operational forecasting of floods, and drought conditions. The objective is to deliver more precise forecast information over greater temporal scales (hours, days, and months) and to depict the magnitude and certainty of occurrence for events ranging from droughts to floods. The AHPS program improves flash-flood forecasts, and provides ensemble streamflow forecasting and flood-forecast maps. AHPS information is accessible to customers by the internet with texts and graphics. This paper describes AHPS forecasting services and their implementation status.

Water Resource Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas

Office of Hydrologic Development, NOAA's National Weather Service, Silver Spring, Maryland

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

Ohio River Forecast Center, NOAA's National Weather Service, Wilmington, Ohio

Office of Science and Technology, NOAA's National Weather Service, Silver Spring, Maryland (formerly Weather Forecast Office, Grand Forks, North Dakota)

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: John McEnery, Texas Tech University, Water Resources Center, Box 41022, Lubbock, TX 79409-1022, E-mail: john.mcenery@coe.ttu.edu

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) program was established to meet our nation's need for more precise flash-flood forecast information. AHPS uses NOAA investments in remote sensing, precipitation forecasts, climate predictions, data automation, hydrologic science, and operational forecast system technologies. AHPS establishes a pathway for the infusion of new verified science and technology, and expands the use of NWS climate, weather, and water analyses and information products. State-of-the-art science is used for improved operational forecasting of floods, and drought conditions. The objective is to deliver more precise forecast information over greater temporal scales (hours, days, and months) and to depict the magnitude and certainty of occurrence for events ranging from droughts to floods. The AHPS program improves flash-flood forecasts, and provides ensemble streamflow forecasting and flood-forecast maps. AHPS information is accessible to customers by the internet with texts and graphics. This paper describes AHPS forecasting services and their implementation status.

Water Resource Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas

Office of Hydrologic Development, NOAA's National Weather Service, Silver Spring, Maryland

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

Ohio River Forecast Center, NOAA's National Weather Service, Wilmington, Ohio

Office of Science and Technology, NOAA's National Weather Service, Silver Spring, Maryland (formerly Weather Forecast Office, Grand Forks, North Dakota)

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: John McEnery, Texas Tech University, Water Resources Center, Box 41022, Lubbock, TX 79409-1022, E-mail: john.mcenery@coe.ttu.edu
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