Dual-Doppler Lidar Measurements for Improving Dispersion Models

Chris G. Collier
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Fay Davies
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Karen E. Bozier
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Anthony R. Holt
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Doug R. Middleton
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Guy N. Pearson
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Stephan Siemen
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Dave V. Willetts
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Graham J. G. Upton
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Rob I. Young
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Dispersion of pollutants in the urban atmosphere is a subject that is presently under much investigation. In this paper the variables used in turbulent dispersion and plume rise schemes of the Met Office Nuclear Accident Model (NAME) are discussed. Those parameters that can be measured by Doppler lidar are emphasized. Information derived from simultaneous measurements from two Doppler lidars are presented, using methodologies not tried previously, with the aim of improving the forecasting of urban pollution dispersion. The results demonstrate how Doppler lidars can be used as measuring tools for the specific parameters needed within urban dispersion models. A procedure used for carrying out the dual-lidar measurements is outlined. This research shows how dual-lidar measurements can be used to calculate the relevant dispersion parameters, and compares the dual-lidar measurements with model calculations in a case study. Differences between model parameters and lidar observations are discussed. Dual-Doppler lidar data are extremely useful for measuring turbulence profiles within the part of the atmospheric boundary layer that is inaccessible using traditional methods.

University of Salford, Greater Manchester, United Kingdom

University of Essex, Colchester, Essex, United Kingdom

UK Met Office, Exeter, Devon, United Kingdom

QinetiQ, Malvern, Worcester, United Kingdom

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Chris G. Collier, School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Peel Bldg., Greater Manchester, M5 4WT, United Kingdom, E-mail: c.g.collier@salford.ac.uk

Dispersion of pollutants in the urban atmosphere is a subject that is presently under much investigation. In this paper the variables used in turbulent dispersion and plume rise schemes of the Met Office Nuclear Accident Model (NAME) are discussed. Those parameters that can be measured by Doppler lidar are emphasized. Information derived from simultaneous measurements from two Doppler lidars are presented, using methodologies not tried previously, with the aim of improving the forecasting of urban pollution dispersion. The results demonstrate how Doppler lidars can be used as measuring tools for the specific parameters needed within urban dispersion models. A procedure used for carrying out the dual-lidar measurements is outlined. This research shows how dual-lidar measurements can be used to calculate the relevant dispersion parameters, and compares the dual-lidar measurements with model calculations in a case study. Differences between model parameters and lidar observations are discussed. Dual-Doppler lidar data are extremely useful for measuring turbulence profiles within the part of the atmospheric boundary layer that is inaccessible using traditional methods.

University of Salford, Greater Manchester, United Kingdom

University of Essex, Colchester, Essex, United Kingdom

UK Met Office, Exeter, Devon, United Kingdom

QinetiQ, Malvern, Worcester, United Kingdom

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Chris G. Collier, School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Peel Bldg., Greater Manchester, M5 4WT, United Kingdom, E-mail: c.g.collier@salford.ac.uk
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