Northern Tales: A Synthesis of MAGS Atmospheric and Hydrometeorological Research

View More View Less
© Get Permissions
Full access

The Mackenzie Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Study (MAGS) is one of the continental-scale experiments approved specifically by GEWEX to better understand and model water and energy cycling at high latitudes. The project has gone through two phases since its inception in 1994 and conclusion in December 2005. Many scientific results have been achieved through MAGS research to advance our understanding of the Mackenzie River basin climate system. This article is a synthesis of its atmospheric research achievements through an integrative description of the basin's climate system, along with highlights of MAGS research that has advanced our knowledge and understanding of various key aspects of the system. In particular, the significance of MAGS research is discussed in the hancing knowledge of the basin's hydroclimate with focuses on i) the large-scale atmospheric processes that control the transport of water and energy into the basin, and ii) the interactions of the large-scale atmospheric flows with physical features of the basin's environment in affecting the weather and climate of the basin.

Climate Research Division, Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Kit K. Szeto, Science and Technology Branch, Climate Research Division, Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto ON M3H 5T4, Canada, E-mail:kit.szeto@ec.gc.ca

The Mackenzie Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Study (MAGS) is one of the continental-scale experiments approved specifically by GEWEX to better understand and model water and energy cycling at high latitudes. The project has gone through two phases since its inception in 1994 and conclusion in December 2005. Many scientific results have been achieved through MAGS research to advance our understanding of the Mackenzie River basin climate system. This article is a synthesis of its atmospheric research achievements through an integrative description of the basin's climate system, along with highlights of MAGS research that has advanced our knowledge and understanding of various key aspects of the system. In particular, the significance of MAGS research is discussed in the hancing knowledge of the basin's hydroclimate with focuses on i) the large-scale atmospheric processes that control the transport of water and energy into the basin, and ii) the interactions of the large-scale atmospheric flows with physical features of the basin's environment in affecting the weather and climate of the basin.

Climate Research Division, Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Kit K. Szeto, Science and Technology Branch, Climate Research Division, Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto ON M3H 5T4, Canada, E-mail:kit.szeto@ec.gc.ca
Save