Resurgence in Ice Nuclei Measurement Research

View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
  • | 2 Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany
  • | 3 Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland
  • | 4 Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming
  • | 5 Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, and Energy, Environment and Water Research Center, The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia, Cyprus
  • | 6 Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina
  • | 7 Meteorological Research Institute of Japan, Tsukuba City, Japan
  • | 8 Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany
  • | 9 Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany
  • | 10 Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland, and Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • | 11 Met Office, Exeter, United Kingdom
  • | 12 Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
  • | 13 Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany
  • | 14 Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
  • | 15 Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland
  • | 16 Meteorological Research Institute of Japan, Tsukuba City, Japan
  • | 17 Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany
  • | 18 Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  • | 19 Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
  • | 20 Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece
  • | 21 Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
© Get Permissions
Full access

Understanding cloud and precipitation responses to variations in atmospheric aerosols remains an important research topic for improving the prediction of climate. Knowledge is most uncertain, and the potential impact on climate is largest with regard to how aerosols impact ice formation in clouds. In this paper, we show that research on atmospheric ice nucleation, including the development of new measurement systems, is occurring at a renewed and historically unparalleled level. A historical perspective is provided on the methods and challenges of measuring ice nuclei, and the various factors that led to a lull in research efforts during a nearly 20-yr period centered about 30 yr ago. Workshops played a major role in defining critical needs for improving measurements at that time and helped to guide renewed efforts. Workshops were recently revived for evaluating present research progress. We argue that encouraging progress has been made in the consistency of measurements using the present generation of ice nucleation instruments. Through comparison to laboratory cloud simulations, these ice nuclei measurements have provided increased confidence in our ability to quantify primary ice formation by atmospheric aerosols.

Understanding cloud and precipitation responses to variations in atmospheric aerosols remains an important research topic for improving the prediction of climate. Knowledge is most uncertain, and the potential impact on climate is largest with regard to how aerosols impact ice formation in clouds. In this paper, we show that research on atmospheric ice nucleation, including the development of new measurement systems, is occurring at a renewed and historically unparalleled level. A historical perspective is provided on the methods and challenges of measuring ice nuclei, and the various factors that led to a lull in research efforts during a nearly 20-yr period centered about 30 yr ago. Workshops played a major role in defining critical needs for improving measurements at that time and helped to guide renewed efforts. Workshops were recently revived for evaluating present research progress. We argue that encouraging progress has been made in the consistency of measurements using the present generation of ice nucleation instruments. Through comparison to laboratory cloud simulations, these ice nuclei measurements have provided increased confidence in our ability to quantify primary ice formation by atmospheric aerosols.

Save