Aerosol and Cloud Experiments in the Eastern North Atlantic (ACE-ENA)

View More View Less
  • 1 a Center for Aerosol Science and Engineering, Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
  • | 2 b Environmental and Climate Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, USA
  • | 3 c Department of Atmospheric Science, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
  • | 4 d Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA
  • | 5 e School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA.
  • | 6 f Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA
  • | 7 g Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA
  • | 8 h Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA
  • | 9 i Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters, Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing, China
  • | 10 j Department of Geography and Atmospheric Science, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, USA
  • | 11 k Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington, USA
  • | 12 l Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA
  • | 13 m Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri, USA
  • | 14 n Department of Atmosphere Science, Yonsei university, Seoul, Korea
  • | 15 o Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA
  • | 16 p Centre of Climate, Meteorology and Global Change (CMMG), University of Azores, Angra do Heroísmo, Portugal
  • | 17 q ESCER Centre, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Quebec at Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • | 18 r Department of Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA
  • | 19 s Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, USA
  • | 20 t Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA
  • | 21 u Sonoma Technology Inc., Petaluma, CA, USA
  • | 22 v Atmospheric Sciences Program and Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, USA
  • | 23 w Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA
  • | 24 x School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA
  • | 25 y Physics Department, University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), Baltimore, MD, USA
© Get Permissions
Full access

Abstract

With their extensive coverage, marine low clouds greatly impact global climate. Presently, marine low clouds are poorly represented in global climate models, and the response of marine low clouds to changes in atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols remains the major source of uncertainty in climate simulations. The Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) is a region of persistent but diverse subtropical marine boundary layer clouds, whose albedo and precipitation are highly susceptible to perturbations in aerosol properties. In addition, the ENA is periodically impacted by continental aerosols, making it an excellent location to study the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) budget in a remote marine region periodically perturbed by anthropogenic emissions, and to investigate the impacts of long-range transport of aerosols on remote marine clouds. The Aerosol and Cloud Experiments in Eastern North Atlantic (ACE-ENA) campaign was motivated by the need of comprehensive in-situ measurements for improving the understanding of marine boundary layer CCN budget, cloud and drizzle microphysics, and the impact of aerosol on marine low cloud and precipitation. The airborne deployments took place from June 21 to July 20, 2017 and January 15 to February 18, 2018 in the Azores. The flights were designed to maximize the synergy between in-situ airborne measurements and ongoing long-term observations at a ground site. Here we present measurements, observation strategy, meteorological conditions during the campaign, and preliminary findings. Finally, we discuss future analyses and modeling studies that improve the understanding and representation of marine boundary layer aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and the interactions among them.

Current affiliation: JUUL Labs, San Francisco, CA, USA

Current affiliation: Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA

Current affiliation: Environmental and Climate Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, USA

Corresponding author: Jian Wang, jian@wustl.edu

Abstract

With their extensive coverage, marine low clouds greatly impact global climate. Presently, marine low clouds are poorly represented in global climate models, and the response of marine low clouds to changes in atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols remains the major source of uncertainty in climate simulations. The Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) is a region of persistent but diverse subtropical marine boundary layer clouds, whose albedo and precipitation are highly susceptible to perturbations in aerosol properties. In addition, the ENA is periodically impacted by continental aerosols, making it an excellent location to study the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) budget in a remote marine region periodically perturbed by anthropogenic emissions, and to investigate the impacts of long-range transport of aerosols on remote marine clouds. The Aerosol and Cloud Experiments in Eastern North Atlantic (ACE-ENA) campaign was motivated by the need of comprehensive in-situ measurements for improving the understanding of marine boundary layer CCN budget, cloud and drizzle microphysics, and the impact of aerosol on marine low cloud and precipitation. The airborne deployments took place from June 21 to July 20, 2017 and January 15 to February 18, 2018 in the Azores. The flights were designed to maximize the synergy between in-situ airborne measurements and ongoing long-term observations at a ground site. Here we present measurements, observation strategy, meteorological conditions during the campaign, and preliminary findings. Finally, we discuss future analyses and modeling studies that improve the understanding and representation of marine boundary layer aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and the interactions among them.

Current affiliation: JUUL Labs, San Francisco, CA, USA

Current affiliation: Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA

Current affiliation: Environmental and Climate Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, USA

Corresponding author: Jian Wang, jian@wustl.edu
Save