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Job analyses of Earth science data librarians and data managers

Bradley Wade BishopaUniversity of Tennessee-Knoxville, School of Information Sciences, Knoxville, TN

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Ashley Marie OrehekaUniversity of Tennessee-Knoxville, School of Information Sciences, Knoxville, TN

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Hannah R. CollieraUniversity of Tennessee-Knoxville, School of Information Sciences, Knoxville, TN

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Abstract

This study’s purpose is to capture the skills of Earth science data managers and librarians through interviews with current job holders. Job analysis interviews were conducted of fourteen participants –six librarians and eight data managers—to assess the types and frequencies of job tasks. Participants identified tasks related to communication, including collaboration, teaching, and project management activities. Data specific tasks included data discovery, processing, and curation, which require an understanding of the data, technology, and information infrastructures to support data use, re-use, and preservation. Most respondents had formal science education and six had a master’s degree in Library and Information Sciences. Most of the knowledge, skills, and abilities for these workers were acquired through on-the-job experience, but future professionals in these careers may benefit from tailored education informed through job analyses.

Corresponding author: Bradley Wade Bishop, wade.bishop@utk.edu

Abstract

This study’s purpose is to capture the skills of Earth science data managers and librarians through interviews with current job holders. Job analysis interviews were conducted of fourteen participants –six librarians and eight data managers—to assess the types and frequencies of job tasks. Participants identified tasks related to communication, including collaboration, teaching, and project management activities. Data specific tasks included data discovery, processing, and curation, which require an understanding of the data, technology, and information infrastructures to support data use, re-use, and preservation. Most respondents had formal science education and six had a master’s degree in Library and Information Sciences. Most of the knowledge, skills, and abilities for these workers were acquired through on-the-job experience, but future professionals in these careers may benefit from tailored education informed through job analyses.

Corresponding author: Bradley Wade Bishop, wade.bishop@utk.edu
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