• Field, P. R., , and R. Wood, 2007: Precipitation and cloud structure in midlatitude cyclones. J. Climate, 20 , 233254.

  • Wentz, F. J., , and T. Meissner, cited. 2000: Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD), version 2: AMSR Ocean Algorithm. RSS Tech. Proposal 121599A-1. Remote Sensing Systems, Santa Rosa, CA, 66 pp. [Available online at http://www.remss.com/papers/amsr/AMSR_Ocean_Algorithm_Version_2.pdf.].

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    New version of Fig. 14 in Field and Wood (2007). Mean cyclone composite values within a 2000-km circle located at the domain center. The error bars represent twice the estimate standard error for the mean value. Warm conveyor rain rate is plotted against rain rate derived from combining cyclone strength and atmospheric moisture with a moist warm conveyor belt argument (cyclone mean rain rate = 0.023〈V〉 〈WVP〉). The circles represent the results from seasonal composites: w: winter [boreal: December–February (DJF); austral: June–August (JJA)], sp: spring [boreal: March–May (MAM); austral: September–November (SON)], su: summer (boreal: JJA; austral: DJF), and f: fall (boreal: SON; austral: MAM).

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CORRIGENDUM

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  • 1 NCAR, Boulder, Colorado
  • 2 University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
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Corresponding author address: Paul R. Field, NCAR, 3450 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80301. Email: prfield@ucar.edu

Corresponding author address: Paul R. Field, NCAR, 3450 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80301. Email: prfield@ucar.edu

We have discovered an error with some of the processing that affected only the rainfall rates given in Field and Wood (2007). However, the main finding from the satellite data of the success of the warm conveyor belt model to explain the rainfall rates remains unchanged upon correcting this error.

In the satellite analysis the 1° × 1° aggregated data were screened to remove rain rates where the sea surface temperature was colder than 278 K to avoid any potential problems caused by snow/rain ambiguity associated with a low freezing level. However, this screening also inadvertently filtered out regions where the sea surface temperature could not be retrieved, where rainfall rates exceed 48 mm day−1 (Wentz and Meissner 2000). Therefore, the satellite data reported were biased toward lower rainfall rates. We reanalyzed the data without this incorrect screening and found that the rainfall rates for the composites were qualitatively the same as reported by Field and Wood (2007), but increased quantitatively by ∼40% on average.

Here, we repeat Tables 1 and 2 where only the rain-rate row has been modified. We also reproduce (Fig. 1) the warm conveyor belt in Fig. 14 using a constant c = 0.023 [originally 0.016; see Eq. (1) in Field and Wood 2007]. Newly derived color Figs. 3d and 8 (not shown) are largely similar to the originals if the original color scale values are used after being multiplied by 1.35. Corrected data files and figures have been posted online (see http://www.atmos.washington.edu/~robwood/data/cyclones.html).

REFERENCES

  • Field, P. R., , and R. Wood, 2007: Precipitation and cloud structure in midlatitude cyclones. J. Climate, 20 , 233254.

  • Wentz, F. J., , and T. Meissner, cited. 2000: Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD), version 2: AMSR Ocean Algorithm. RSS Tech. Proposal 121599A-1. Remote Sensing Systems, Santa Rosa, CA, 66 pp. [Available online at http://www.remss.com/papers/amsr/AMSR_Ocean_Algorithm_Version_2.pdf.].

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

New version of Fig. 14 in Field and Wood (2007). Mean cyclone composite values within a 2000-km circle located at the domain center. The error bars represent twice the estimate standard error for the mean value. Warm conveyor rain rate is plotted against rain rate derived from combining cyclone strength and atmospheric moisture with a moist warm conveyor belt argument (cyclone mean rain rate = 0.023〈V〉 〈WVP〉). The circles represent the results from seasonal composites: w: winter [boreal: December–February (DJF); austral: June–August (JJA)], sp: spring [boreal: March–May (MAM); austral: September–November (SON)], su: summer (boreal: JJA; austral: DJF), and f: fall (boreal: SON; austral: MAM).

Citation: Journal of Climate 20, 20; 10.1175/JCLI4396.1

Table 1.

Summary of composite mean values obtained by averaging over a circle of radius 2000 km located at the center of the domain (apart from the pressure anomaly Pa that is just the value at the center of the domain). Standard error given in parentheses.

Table 1.
Table 2.

Summary of seasonal composite mean values obtained by averaging over a circle of radius 2000 km located at the center of the domain (apart from the pressure anomaly Pa that is just the value at the center of the domain). Standard error given in parentheses.

Table 2.
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