• Mason, S., , C. Jakob, , A. Protat, , and J. Delanoë, 2014: Characterizing observed midtopped cloud regimes associated with Southern Ocean shortwave radiation biases. J. Climate, 27, 61896203, doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-14-00139.1.

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    Instantaneous cloud structure classes displayed according to (top) atmospheric temperature and (middle) height. The bar represents the distribution of known radar–lidar (DARDAR) cloud phase categories within each cloud structure class. To indicate radar signal contamination near the ground, the lowest 1.50 km of the height profiles are stippled. (bottom) The column chart indicates the relative frequency of occurrence of each cloud structure class within the cloud regimes of interest; the overall relative frequency of occurrence of each cloud structure is marked with a gray line.

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  • 1 School of Earth Atmosphere and Environment, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
  • 2 Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • 3 Laboratoire Atmosphéres, Milieux, Observations Spatiales, UVSQ/IPSL/CNRS, Paris, France
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Corresponding author address: Shannon Mason, School of Earth Atmosphere and Environment, Monash University, Clayton VIC 3800, Australia. E-mail: shannon.mason@monash.edu

Corresponding author address: Shannon Mason, School of Earth Atmosphere and Environment, Monash University, Clayton VIC 3800, Australia. E-mail: shannon.mason@monash.edu

We have identified an error in the analysis related to Fig. 10 in Mason et al. (2014). The error affected how counts of cloud thermodynamic phase were normalized in preparation for the clustering algorithm, and therefore the resultant histograms were incorrect. Correcting the analysis led to slight changes in some resulting cloud structure profiles; an additional cluster was added to better distinguish between features. The error did not significantly alter the findings of the analysis nor those of the paper overall.

The corrected figure is reproduced below. The last sentence of the first paragraph of page 6200 should read as follows:

The algorithm requires the prescription of the number of states (clusters) generated: given our goal of identifying a relatively small number of broad recurring classes of cloud structure, 11 classes offered sufficient detail for our investigation; fewer classes did not capture the range of cloud structures, while additional classes resulted in redundant information.

The final paragraph of page 6200 should read as follows:

P2 and P2′ represent low and shallow cloud layers containing significant supercooled liquid and mixed-phase water; P2 has cloud tops below 1 km and around −5°C, and P2′ has cloud tops below 1.5 km and −10°C. These cloud structure profiles are most frequent within the stratiform cloud regimes associated with subsidence: the lower and warmer profile P2 is most frequent within S3 (24%), while the cooler and higher P2′ is characteristic of M2 (23%) and M1 (19%).

Fig. 10.
Fig. 10.

Instantaneous cloud structure classes displayed according to (top) atmospheric temperature and (middle) height. The bar represents the distribution of known radar–lidar (DARDAR) cloud phase categories within each cloud structure class. To indicate radar signal contamination near the ground, the lowest 1.50 km of the height profiles are stippled. (bottom) The column chart indicates the relative frequency of occurrence of each cloud structure class within the cloud regimes of interest; the overall relative frequency of occurrence of each cloud structure is marked with a gray line.

Citation: Journal of Climate 27, 24; 10.1175/JCLI-D-14-00659.1

REFERENCE

Mason, S., , C. Jakob, , A. Protat, , and J. Delanoë, 2014: Characterizing observed midtopped cloud regimes associated with Southern Ocean shortwave radiation biases. J. Climate, 27, 61896203, doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-14-00139.1.

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