Snowfall From Lake-Effect Storms

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  • 1 State University of New York, Albany, N.Y.
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Abstract

Three yr of winter lake-storm data were analyzed to determine snowfall distribution patterns downwind of Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. The total amount of snowfall and the area of ground cover in each of 23 lake-effect storms were determined for both lakes. Total snowfall mass was highly dependent on time of year; November and early December storms were two to five times more productive than January storms. A considerable variation in snow density (snowfall depth to melt water ratio) could be attributed mainly to differences in snow crystal type.

Abstract

Three yr of winter lake-storm data were analyzed to determine snowfall distribution patterns downwind of Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. The total amount of snowfall and the area of ground cover in each of 23 lake-effect storms were determined for both lakes. Total snowfall mass was highly dependent on time of year; November and early December storms were two to five times more productive than January storms. A considerable variation in snow density (snowfall depth to melt water ratio) could be attributed mainly to differences in snow crystal type.

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