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Some Effects of Surface Anomalies in a Global General Circulation Model

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  • 1 Department of Meteorology and Oceanography, New York University, New York, N.Y. 2
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Abstract

The Mintz-Arakawa two-level general circulation model has been used in a series of experiments to compute the response of the atmosphere to certain persistent sea-surface temperature anomalies and to changes in the position of the continental Northern Hemisphere snow line over periods up to 90 days. Results are shown in terms of differences between anomaly and control histories as revealed by global, 30-day mean sea-level pressure maps and time series of three regional indices of synoptic activity. The experiments show significant interhemispheric effects after about 1 mo, phase shifts of 1–2 weeks in major cyclone developments, stronger reactions to sea-temperature anomalies in winter than in summer, and marked influence of the snow line on the winter monsoonal pressure difference between the continents and the North Atlantic Ocean.

Abstract

The Mintz-Arakawa two-level general circulation model has been used in a series of experiments to compute the response of the atmosphere to certain persistent sea-surface temperature anomalies and to changes in the position of the continental Northern Hemisphere snow line over periods up to 90 days. Results are shown in terms of differences between anomaly and control histories as revealed by global, 30-day mean sea-level pressure maps and time series of three regional indices of synoptic activity. The experiments show significant interhemispheric effects after about 1 mo, phase shifts of 1–2 weeks in major cyclone developments, stronger reactions to sea-temperature anomalies in winter than in summer, and marked influence of the snow line on the winter monsoonal pressure difference between the continents and the North Atlantic Ocean.

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