Structure of an Evolving Hailstorm Part V: Synthesis and implications for Hail Growth and Hail Suppression

K.A. Browning National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo. 80303

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J.C. Frankhauser National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo. 80303

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J.-P. Chalon National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo. 80303

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P.J. Eccles National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo. 80303

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R.G. Strauch NOAA/ERL/Wave Propagation Laboratory, Boulder, Colo. 80303

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F.H. Merrem NOAA/ERL/Wave Propagation Laboratory, Boulder, Colo. 80303

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D.J. Musil Institute of Atmospheric Sciences, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, S. Dak. 57701

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E.L. May Institute of Atmospheric Sciences, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, S. Dak. 57701

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W.R. Sand Institute of Atmospheric Sciences, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, S. Dak. 57701

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Abstract

A model of an evolving hailstorm is synthesized from data presented in four related papers in this issue. The storm model, which is applicable to a class of ordinary multicell hailstorms and similar to earlier models derived by workers in South Dakota and Alberta, is discussed in terms of the growth of hail and its implications for hail suppression. Hail is grown in time–evolving updrafts that begin as discrete new clouds on the flank of the storm. Low concentrations of embryos develop rapidly within each of these clouds. The embryos subsequently grow into small hailstones while suspended near or above, the −20°C level as each new cloud grows and becomes the main updraft. Recycling is not a feature of this model as it is in supercell models. To improve the chance of silver iodide seeding being effective in suppressing the growth of hall in multicell storms, it is proposed that the seeding should be carried out not in the main updraft as is often the practice, but, rather, in the regions of weaker updraft associated with the early stages of developing clouds an the flank of the storm.

Abstract

A model of an evolving hailstorm is synthesized from data presented in four related papers in this issue. The storm model, which is applicable to a class of ordinary multicell hailstorms and similar to earlier models derived by workers in South Dakota and Alberta, is discussed in terms of the growth of hail and its implications for hail suppression. Hail is grown in time–evolving updrafts that begin as discrete new clouds on the flank of the storm. Low concentrations of embryos develop rapidly within each of these clouds. The embryos subsequently grow into small hailstones while suspended near or above, the −20°C level as each new cloud grows and becomes the main updraft. Recycling is not a feature of this model as it is in supercell models. To improve the chance of silver iodide seeding being effective in suppressing the growth of hall in multicell storms, it is proposed that the seeding should be carried out not in the main updraft as is often the practice, but, rather, in the regions of weaker updraft associated with the early stages of developing clouds an the flank of the storm.

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