Operational Objective Temperature Forecasts at Non–MOS Stations

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  • 1 National Weather Service Forecast Office, Cheyenne, Wyo. 82001
  • | 2 Agricultural Engineering Division, University of Wyoming, Laramie 82071
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Abstract

A method is presented for increasing the number of points for which a local forecast office may obtain objective maximum and minimum temperature forecasts twice daily. The method is simple enough that it may be both developed locally and used operationally in daily forecasts with a minimum amount of time involved. The additional objective temperature forecasts rely heavily on objective temperature forecasts produced twice daily at the National Meteorological Center, but extrapolates these forecast through statistical methods to secondary points. Therefore, they remain strongly linked to the operational numerical models. Examples of “predictor” curves are also presented.

Abstract

A method is presented for increasing the number of points for which a local forecast office may obtain objective maximum and minimum temperature forecasts twice daily. The method is simple enough that it may be both developed locally and used operationally in daily forecasts with a minimum amount of time involved. The additional objective temperature forecasts rely heavily on objective temperature forecasts produced twice daily at the National Meteorological Center, but extrapolates these forecast through statistical methods to secondary points. Therefore, they remain strongly linked to the operational numerical models. Examples of “predictor” curves are also presented.

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