The Role of Inward Mixing in the Dissipation of Fog and Stratus

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  • 1 National Environmental Satellite Service, NOAA, Washington, DC 20233
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Abstract

Satellite imagery shows that extensive areas of radiation fog and stratus dissipate from their outer edges inward. It is proposed that an inward mixing process is at least partially responsible for this inward erosion. The temperature gradient along the fog boundary, which is produced by differential surface heating, should set up a circulation similar to that of a sea breeze. This circulation erodes the fog along the edges as warmer, drier air sinks and mixes into the fog.

Abstract

Satellite imagery shows that extensive areas of radiation fog and stratus dissipate from their outer edges inward. It is proposed that an inward mixing process is at least partially responsible for this inward erosion. The temperature gradient along the fog boundary, which is produced by differential surface heating, should set up a circulation similar to that of a sea breeze. This circulation erodes the fog along the edges as warmer, drier air sinks and mixes into the fog.

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