All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 626 285 42
PDF Downloads 557 267 29

Satellite Detection of Urban Heat Islands

Michael MatsonNOAA/National Environmental Satellite Service, Washington, DC 20233

Search for other papers by Michael Matson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
E. Paul McclainNOAA/National Environmental Satellite Service, Washington, DC 20233

Search for other papers by E. Paul Mcclain in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
David F. McGinnis Jr.NOAA/National Environmental Satellite Service, Washington, DC 20233

Search for other papers by David F. McGinnis Jr. in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
John A. PritchardNOAA/National Environmental Satellite Service, Washington, DC 20233

Search for other papers by John A. Pritchard in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Full access

Abstract

On 28 July 1977 an unusually cloud-ftee nighttime thermal infrared image of the midwestern and northeastern United States from the NOAA 5 satellite enabled detection of more than 50 urban beat islands. Analysis of digital data from the satellite for selected cities yielded maximum urban-rural temperature differences ranging from 2.6 to 6.5°C. Through computer enhancement and enlargement of the satellite imagery, the urban beat islands of St. Louis, Washington, DC and Baltimore can be depicted at a usable scale as large as 1:500 000. A comparison of the enhanced thermal infrared imagery with the 1970 U.S. Census maps of urbanized areas for the three cities indicates the extent of possible urbanization changes in the last seven years.

Abstract

On 28 July 1977 an unusually cloud-ftee nighttime thermal infrared image of the midwestern and northeastern United States from the NOAA 5 satellite enabled detection of more than 50 urban beat islands. Analysis of digital data from the satellite for selected cities yielded maximum urban-rural temperature differences ranging from 2.6 to 6.5°C. Through computer enhancement and enlargement of the satellite imagery, the urban beat islands of St. Louis, Washington, DC and Baltimore can be depicted at a usable scale as large as 1:500 000. A comparison of the enhanced thermal infrared imagery with the 1970 U.S. Census maps of urbanized areas for the three cities indicates the extent of possible urbanization changes in the last seven years.

Save