Precipitation over the Pacific Ocean, 30°S to 60°N

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  • 1 Department of Geological Sciences, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182
  • | 2 Department of Oceanography, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93940
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Abstract

By using present weather observations taken by ships and relating them to a given amount of precipitation, new estimates of oceanic rainfall for the Pacific Ocean between 30°S and 60°N have been derived. Satellite microwave measurements and Taylor's (1973) island analysis support our findings. Annual and quarterly rainfall maps, drawn from our estimates, agree with other modem, land-derived values, but provide greater detail. Between the equator and 60°N, the annual depth and volume rainfall totals are 1282 mm and 1.16×105 km3, respectively. Maps of amplitude and phase show that most of the rainfall north of 28°N occurs in winter, while maximum rainfall occurs in July and August in the tropics. Diurnal rainfall, studied at selected locations, is at a minimum at noon in all but the western pan of the North Pacific. Here there is no distinct minimum.

Abstract

By using present weather observations taken by ships and relating them to a given amount of precipitation, new estimates of oceanic rainfall for the Pacific Ocean between 30°S and 60°N have been derived. Satellite microwave measurements and Taylor's (1973) island analysis support our findings. Annual and quarterly rainfall maps, drawn from our estimates, agree with other modem, land-derived values, but provide greater detail. Between the equator and 60°N, the annual depth and volume rainfall totals are 1282 mm and 1.16×105 km3, respectively. Maps of amplitude and phase show that most of the rainfall north of 28°N occurs in winter, while maximum rainfall occurs in July and August in the tropics. Diurnal rainfall, studied at selected locations, is at a minimum at noon in all but the western pan of the North Pacific. Here there is no distinct minimum.

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