Gravitational Character of Cold Surges during Winter MONEX

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  • 1 Department of Meteorology, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93940
  • | 2 Department of Atmospheric Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, China
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Abstract

The surface pressure, temperature, dew point and wind data over the South China Sea and vicinity during Winter MONEX are examined to determine the timing of the passage of cold surges at various reporting stations. It is found that for more than half of the surge cases during Winter MONEX, a surge occurs in two stages separated by a time interval of several hours to approximately one day. The first stage is often characterized by a significant rise in pressure, while the second stage by a sharp decrease in dew point temperature. Freshening of surface winds may accompany either or both stages. The time separation between the two stages is relatively short at the upstream stations but generally long at the downstream stations. The second stage is associated with a frontal passage. On the other hand, the first stage is not clearly associated with any significant synoptic events. From its very fast propagation speed which increases with an inferred depth scale, and an increase in the local cross-isobar angle of the surface wind during passage, the first stage is identified with a synoptic-scale gravity wave type motion.

Abstract

The surface pressure, temperature, dew point and wind data over the South China Sea and vicinity during Winter MONEX are examined to determine the timing of the passage of cold surges at various reporting stations. It is found that for more than half of the surge cases during Winter MONEX, a surge occurs in two stages separated by a time interval of several hours to approximately one day. The first stage is often characterized by a significant rise in pressure, while the second stage by a sharp decrease in dew point temperature. Freshening of surface winds may accompany either or both stages. The time separation between the two stages is relatively short at the upstream stations but generally long at the downstream stations. The second stage is associated with a frontal passage. On the other hand, the first stage is not clearly associated with any significant synoptic events. From its very fast propagation speed which increases with an inferred depth scale, and an increase in the local cross-isobar angle of the surface wind during passage, the first stage is identified with a synoptic-scale gravity wave type motion.

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