Clear-Air Mesocyclone during the JAWS Project

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  • 1 Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024
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Abstract

On 5 June 1982, a clear-air mesocyclone translated through the observational network of the Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) Project new Denver, Colorado. Mesoscale analysis revealed both a mesocirculation defined by the wind field, and a mesolow defined by the pressure field. The mesocyclone appeared to be a result of a foehn-type wind descending the slopes of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. It is believed that this feature is the “shallow orographic low” that has been shown in past studies to be an important stage in the development of cyclones in the lee of large mountain ranges.

Abstract

On 5 June 1982, a clear-air mesocyclone translated through the observational network of the Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) Project new Denver, Colorado. Mesoscale analysis revealed both a mesocirculation defined by the wind field, and a mesolow defined by the pressure field. The mesocyclone appeared to be a result of a foehn-type wind descending the slopes of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. It is believed that this feature is the “shallow orographic low” that has been shown in past studies to be an important stage in the development of cyclones in the lee of large mountain ranges.

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